„What More Can Central Banks Do? An Interview with Dr. William White“

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInEmail this to someone

William White ist immer wieder auf diesen Seiten präsent. Er ist sicherlich einer der besten Experten zur Lage der Weltwirtschaft, der Wirkungen der Zentralbankpolitik und den Folgen der Überschuldung in der Welt. Hier ein Interview vom letzten Februar, in jeder Hinsicht lesenswert:

  • What the central banks did in 2008 was totally appropriate. The markets were basically collapsing. We had a kind of a Minsky moment problem with market illiquidity and the central banks did what they had to do.“
  • „(…) in 2010 when Ben Bernanke, then Chairman of the US Federal Reserve, made clear in a speech that the objective of monetary policy – and specifically quantitative easing – was basically to stimulate aggregate demand. And since then we have had all the central banks around the world pursuing that objective through increasingly unconventional measures.“
  • „(…) the fundamental problem we all face is a problem of too much debt, you know, the headwinds of debt. In a sense it is a problem of insolvency. And relying on central banks to correct this is totally inappropriate, because they can handle problems of illiquidity but they can’t handle problems of insolvency. So I think that the fundamental orientation here is wrong.“
  • „(…) because dealing with problems of insolvency, debt reduction, making debt service more bearable and so forth, demands policies that only governments can implement. Moreover, these policies are likely to be technically hard to implement and will also meet stiff political resistance.“
  • „(…) what we have been doing is both losing efficacy over time, that is to say that the efficiency of the transmission mechanism seems to me to be getting less and less, while the impact of the associated unintended consequences, the side effects of monetary policy, are becoming more and more evident. In the end this is really going to cause us problems.“
  • The whole point is trying to attract spending from the future into today, what is known as intertemporal reallocation. That is just fine. But if you’re bringing that spending forward, at a certain point when tomorrow becomes today – as indeed it must inevitably do – then that future spending that you might otherwise have done is constrained by the spending that you have already done. And that manifests itself in increasing debt levels, which indeed we have already seen.“
  • There are lots of reasons why lower interest rates might produce lower consumption. For example, think about the people who are saving for an annuity or a pension for when they retire. If the roll-up rate is going down, aside from working longer, the only solution is to save more.“
  • There are all these distributional issues to consider too. You know, all these policies have buoyed asset prices a lot and richer people – the ones who have the financial assets and the big houses whose values have increased the most – have gained the most. Conversely, middle class people whose financial assets are largely in the banks, have lost out. Since richer people tend to have a lower marginal propensity to consume out of both income and wealth, then these redistribution effects could cause the economy to grow more slowly, not more rapidly.“
  • Zur Lage in überschuldeten Ländern wie Portugal: „When you get a combination of an economy which is hurting because of debt problems, where the corporate and/or the household sectors are facing these big headwinds of debt, and in addition the banking system becomes challenged, with non-performing loans and the like, the resulting periods of unusually low growth can go on for a decade or more.“
  • „If you get a joint problem of this nature associated with too much debt both in and out of the financial system you have a tiger by the tail.“
  • I would say is to have less austerity and more pro-growth spending. Now I qualify each of these things with the recognition that sometimes and in some countries this will not be possible because of confidence effects in market. Nevertheless, European experience does point to the merits of less austerity as opposed to more.“
  • „(…) a number of countries following essentially mercantilist policies and it would be much better if they re-orientated themselves domestically so that wages could get a larger share of incomes. In countries like Germany, China, Japan, South Korea, for a long period of time and still continuing, that sort of mercantilist approach basically said that you have to keep wages down. I think that has not been helpful, and that we could do more to encourage wage income and spending in many countries.“
  • „We also need many more write-offs – not just debt restructuring but actual reduction of the principal.“
  • The answer to insolvency is not simply to print more money – it may get you out of the problem in the short-run but it simply makes it worse and worse over time. At some point, maybe where we are now, you truly get to the end of a line. You see that what you have been doing is just a short term palliative that is actually making the disease worse.“

Zur Eurokrise:

  • George Soros made the point, in the Financial Times a while back, with an article titled Germany Should Lead or Leave. His view is that you could avoid a lot of problems if the Germans left, not the Greeks. When currency unions split up in the past, normally it was the creditors who left. They see the writing on the wall and they are out of it. If anyone leaves it should be the Germans, the Dutch or whoever wants to go along with them. The debtors would keep the euro, minimizing legal battles, and the creditors would have to be cooperative to minimize their losses.“

Zum Helikopter-Geld:

  • If you give people notes, and you’re putting more notes into the economy than they want to hold, the first thing they’ll do is take the notes and deposit them in the banks again. So it really doesn’t make any difference whether a central bank pays for a deficit with notes or through a cheque that is deposited and shows up as increased reserves held by banks at the central bank.“
  • Whether it’s high existing levels of household sector debt, or whether it’s a Ricardian equivalence where they see-through the government and realize that government debt is really their debt and higher taxes down the line. So they might just sit on it and not spend it.“
  • „(…) the reserves held in the central bank are not debt. They are not liabilities of government. I think that’s just totally wrong. The central bank is 100% a creature of the government. So if you put the two balance sheets together and net them all out, whether it’s cash issued by the central banks, or whether it’s bank reserves on the liability side of the governments accounts, it’s all government debt.“
  • Everything is fine until inflationary pressures or something else shocks up the interest rates. And the minute they go up, it becomes obvious that government debt service has gone high enough so they will have no recourse but to have the central bank finance still more. And when that happens the writing is on the wall, the currency collapses and the inflation becomes essentially uncontrollable. This is a highly non-linear process that cannot be captured by the econometric models that are in widespread use.“
  • „(…) helicopter money is a magic bullet to get us out of a debt problem. My own personal view – and I have to say that I hope I’m wrong – is that it is a highly risky and perhaps even terminally risky policy for countries that already have bad fiscal conditions. We should be thinking about the downsides.“

Sein Fazit:

  • „(…) we now have a global problem. This problem of debt and over-indebtedness is now no longer confined to advanced market economies but includes the emerging market economies as well – not least China.“
  • I view the global economy as a complex, adaptive system. And the character of the complexity and the interdependency is such that, if we get a problem anywhere, I think we are going to have a problem everywhere.
  • „(…) everywhere you look it seems to me you can see a potential trigger.“

→ LinkedIn: „What More Can Central Banks Do? An Interview with Dr. William White“, 9. Februar 2016

12 Antworten
  1. Dietmar Tischer says:

    W. White wie immer mit einem ungetrübten Blick auf die Realitäten.

    Anmerkungen, die nichts von dem nehmen, was er vollkommen richtig sieht:

    > „ (…) the fundamental problem we all face is a problem of too much debt, you know, the headwinds of debt. In a sense it is a problem of insolvency. And relying on central banks to correct this is totally inappropriate, because they can handle problems of illiquidity but they can’t handle problems of insolvency. So I think that thefundamental orientation here is wrong.“

    Die Zentralbanken können schon mit dem Problem der Insolvenz umgehen. Es geschieht dadurch, dass sie es als ein Problem der Illiquidität BEHANDELN, d. h. kontinuierlich für Liquidität sorgen. Geschieht dies, sind insolvente Banken und Staaten TECHNISCH nicht insolvent.

    Dass diese „Orientierung“ fundamental FALSCH sei, ist eine andere Sache.

    Ich würde von W. White gern hören, was die KONSEQUENZEN sind, wenn die Zentralbanken das vermeintlich RICHTIGE tun würden.

    >„The whole point is trying to attract spending from the future into today, what is known as intertemporal reallocation. That is just fine. But if you’re bringing that spending forward, at a certain point when tomorrow becomes today – as indeed it must inevitably do – then that future spending that you might otherwise have done is constrained by the spending that you have already done. And that manifests itself in increasing debt levels, which indeed we have already seen.>

    Das ist der ganze Punkt NUR dann, wenn man so weitermacht wie bisher mit dem Verschuldungsaufbau.

    Es ist nicht der ganze Punkt, wenn man mit (zusätzlichem) Helikoptergeld zusätzliche Nachfrage finanziert.

    >Nevertheless, European experience does point to the merits of less austerity as opposed to more.“>

    In der Situation, in der sich insbesondere die Peripherie der Eurozone befindet, ist m. A. n. eine höhere Staatsverschuldung NUR dann produktiv, wenn die Politik GLEICHZEITIG die erforderlichen STRUKTURREFORMEN für mehr Wettbewerbsfähigkeit durchsetzt. Kann sie dies nicht, dann beschleunigt dies nur den Zerfall der Eurozone.

    Speziell an Sie, M. Stöcker, gerichtet:

    >„(…) ‚helicopter money‘ is a magic bullet to get us out of a debt problem. My own personal view – and I have to say that I hope I’m wrong – is that it is a highly risky and perhaps even terminally risky policy for countries that already have bad fiscal conditions. We should be thinking about the downsides.“>

    Wenn ich das schreibe, ist es Kokolores.

    Ist es auch Kokolores, wenn W. White es schreibt?

    Antworten
    • Michael Stöcker says:

      „Ist es auch Kokolores, wenn W. White es schreibt?“

      White schreibt: „…it is a highly risky and perhaps even terminally risky policy for countries that already have bad fiscal conditions.“ Was bitte schön sind „bad fiscal conditions“??? Auf welche Länder trifft dies zu???

      Richtig ist, das White grundsätzlich sehr skeptisch ist, aber zuletzt auf der Veranstaltung in Leipzig auch sehr offen aussprach, dass er es nicht weiß und selber sehr unsicher ist, wie die Wirkungen tatsächlich sein werden.

      Auch ich leugne keinesfalls potentielle Risiken, schätze aber alle anderen Alternativen als deutlich risikoreicher ein (es wird vermutlich zu einem unkontrollierten Auseinanderbrechen des Eurosystems kommen).

      Um einen exzessiven Missbrauch dieses neuen Instruments zu verhindern, hatte ich ja angeregt, dass über die Höhe eines zentralbankfinanzierten Bürgergeldes im Rahmen einer konzertierten Aktion ein Vorschlag erarbeitet werden sollte, über den anschließend der Souverän im Rahmen einer Volksabstimmung zu entscheiden hat:
      http://think-beyondtheobvious.com/stelters-lektuere/helikoptergeld-fuer-inflation/#comment-17283

      LG Michael Stöcker

      Antworten
      • Dietmar Tischer says:

        Mit „bad fiscal conditions“ meint White m. A. n. hohe Verschuldung. Es gibt viele Länder auf die das zutrifft.

        Für das, um was es hier geht, spielt das keine Rolle, ebenso wenig wie es eine Rolle spielt, welche Ziele mit Helikoptergeld erreicht werden sollen.

        Es geht hier darum, dass er wie ich der Meinung ist, dass Helikoptergeld „terminally risiky“ sein kann und darum, dass dies – wenn ich es sage – Kokolores ist, wenn White es aber sagt, offensichtlich kein Kokolores ist.

        Oder ist es auch Kokolores?

        Nehmen Sie doch bitte einmal dazu Stellung anstatt mit Fragezeichen herumzuopern .

        Niemand weiß mit Gewissheit, was kommt.

        Es ist ja schön und anzuerkennen, dass auch Sie Risiken sehen.

        Deshalb habe ich einen Mechanismus aufgezeigt, wie sich die Dinge zum Desaster, d. h. Hyperinflation entwickeln könnten – als MÖGLICHKEIT, nicht als ein MUSS.

        Allerdings, darauf bestehe ich schon:

        Alle Sicherungen, wie Volksabstimmungen etc. sind KEINE, wenn eine bestimmte Option als die ATTRAKTIVSTE im Interessengeflecht angesehen und daher gewählt wird. Die ERFAHRUNG hat immer wieder gezeigt, dass solche Optionen regelmäßig zum Zuge kommen, egal welche verheerenden späteren Konsequenzen sie auch haben mögen.

        Und Helikoptergeld ist eine verdammt attraktive Option!

      • Michael Stöcker says:

        „Mit „bad fiscal conditions“ meint White m. A. n. hohe Verschuldung. Es gibt viele Länder auf die das zutrifft.“

        Ja, so wird es wohl sein. Aber dies allein ist noch nicht aussagekräftig hinsichtlich der Beurteilung der fiskalischen Situation. Von daher meine drei Fragezeichen. Wie wir in Spanien gesehen haben, können sich die Rahmenbedingungen sehr schnell ändern. Insofern macht eine einfache Fixierung auf die Staatsschuldenquote keinen Sinn. Hohe private Verschuldung kann im Rahmen einer Bilanzrezession sehr schnell die Staatsverschuldung nach oben treiben. Auch unproduktive Investments lassen zuerst die Staatskassen klingeln und dann kommt der Katzenjammer, wenn der unproduktive Boom endet (Spanien).

        „Für das, um was es hier geht, spielt das keine Rolle, ebenso wenig wie es eine Rolle spielt, welche Ziele mit Helikoptergeld erreicht werden sollen.“

        Da bin ich entschieden anderer Meinung. Wenn es nämlich keine produktive Basis gibt (Simbabwe oder auch Brasilien in den 80ern), dann kann ich mit Helikoptergeld sehr schnell eine Währung vernichten. Aber Euroland heute ist weder Brasilien der 80er Jahre geschweige denn Simbabwe. Insofern kann selbstverständlich Helikoptergeld auch „terminally risiky“ sein, in Bezug auf die Situation in Euroland aber z. Z. völlig ausgeschlossen. Für eine Hyperinflation in Euroland bedarf es schon eines Krieges der Dimension WK I oder WK II.

        „Niemand weiß mit Gewissheit, was kommt.“

        So ist es. Wir sollten allerdings endlich die Initiative ergreifen und nicht nur Helikoptergeld verteilen, sondern zugleich mit den daraus resultierenden Mehreinnahmen verstärkt in Bildung und Infrastruktur investieren. Ansonsten erodiert die produktive Basis und die Wahrscheinlichkeit deutlich höherer zukünftiger Inflationsraten wird stark zunehmen. Unter solchen Voraussetzungen könnte unsere Arbeitsministerin dann zukünftig ganz andere (Renten)Angleichungen vorträllern (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8-s6IX4SwXg); nämlich die Angleichung illusionärer Stamokap Wünsche an die realexistierende Ökonomie.

        „Deshalb habe ich einen Mechanismus aufgezeigt, wie sich die Dinge zum Desaster, d. h. Hyperinflation entwickeln könnten – als MÖGLICHKEIT, nicht als ein MUSS.“

        Die MÖGLICHKEIT wird zum einen durch die Höhe des Helikoptergeldes bestimmt und zum anderen durch die produktive Basis. Hohe regelmäßige Beträge bei erodierender produktiver Basis führen sehr wahrscheinlich in die Hyperinflation. Ich plädiere für kleine Beträge, die zudem unter Berücksichtigung des persönlichen Grenzsteuersatzes ausgezahlt werden sowie für eine deutlich höhere post mortem Besteuerung.

        Da nach Einstein nur die menschliche Dummheit mit absoluter Sicherheit unendlich groß ist, besteht selbstverständlich immer ein Restrisiko. Aber der schwäbische Hausmann, der selber ein überzeugter Europäer ist, wird mit seiner Politik – unterstützt durch eine medial irregeleitete Bevölkerung – Europa gegen die Wand fahren. Nach dem unkontrollierten Auseinanderbrechen des Euro wird es vermutlich zu Chaos und Hyperinflation kommen. Hyperinflation allerdings nicht in Deutschland (da gibt es wohl eher einen deflationären Schock mit dann sehr stark steigender Arbeitslosigkeit, sofern die schwarze Null weiterhin heilig ist), aber sehr wahrscheinlich in Griechenland und Portugal. Da ist dann Schluss mit Herumopern. Das wäre eine klassische Tragödie; und zwar für ganz Europa.

        LG Michael Stöcker

    • Michael Stöcker says:

      „Die Zentralbanken können schon mit dem Problem der Insolvenz umgehen. Es geschieht dadurch, dass sie es als ein Problem der Illiquidität BEHANDELN, d. h. kontinuierlich für Liquidität sorgen. Geschieht dies, sind insolvente Banken und Staaten TECHNISCH nicht insolvent.“

      Es gibt grundsätzlich zwei Insolvenztatbestände: Zahlungsunfähigkeit und Überschuldung. Für die Insolvenz muss lediglich ein Tatbestand erfüllt sein. Insofern sind bei korrekter Bilanzierung einige Banken insolvent, da überschuldet. Technisch lässt sich dies nur dadurch hinauszögern, dass man den Grundsatz der Bilanzwahrheit sizilianisch interpretiert und fällige Abschreibungen unterlässt. Wenn allerdings die Insolvenzwelle startet (http://m.welt.de/wirtschaft/article152780028/Wie-Italiens-Arbeiter-ihre-Pleite-Fabriken-retten.html) spätestens dann müssen die Banken uneinbringliche Forderungen abschreiben. Da ist es dann nicht mehr weit bis zur Überschuldung und Insolvenz trotz ausreichender Liquidität (Zombie-Banken).

      Eine solche Entwicklung ist die logisch zwingende Folge persistenter hoher Leistungsbilanzungleichgewichte.

      LG Michael Stöcker

      Antworten
      • Dietmar Tischer says:

        >Es gibt grundsätzlich zwei Insolvenztatbestände: Zahlungsunfähigkeit und Überschuldung. Für die Insolvenz muss lediglich ein Tatbestand erfüllt sein.>

        Das ist richtig, wobei die Überschuldung der schwierigere ist, weil das gegen die Schulden aufzurechnende Vermögen nicht immer einfach zu ermitteln ist und auch Bewertungen unterliegt.

        Zahlungsunfähigkeit ist Zahlungsunfähigkeit. Punkt.

        >Technisch lässt sich dies nur dadurch hinauszögern, dass man den Grundsatz der Bilanzwahrheit sizilianisch interpretiert und fällige Abschreibungen unterlässt.>

        Schon richtig – nur:

        Wann ist was fällig?

        Wenn die Notenbank die Banken mit billiger Liquidität versorgt und diese wiederum durch revolvierende Kredite ihre Kunden, so dass diese immer liquide sind, dann gibt es keine Zahlungsunfähigkeit.

        Dann gibt es keine uneinbringlichen Forderungen und die Banken müssen dergleichen nicht abschreiben.

        Anders, und da haben Sie recht, wenn die Insolvenzwelle startet …

        Deshalb darf sie eben nicht starten.

        Um dies zu gewährleisten, haben wir eine EZB.

  2. Michael Stöcker says:

    Whether it’s high existing levels of household sector debt, or whether it’s a Ricardian equivalence where they see-through the government and realize that government debt is really their debt and higher taxes down the line. So they might just sit on it and not spend it.“
    Ricardian equivalence halte ich für unbegründet: https://zinsfehler.wordpress.com/2013/10/23/das-ricardianische-aquivalenz-theorem-lost-in-recession/

    LG Michael Stöcker

    Antworten
  3. Michael Stöcker says:

    „There are lots of reasons why lower interest rates might produce lower consumption. For example, think about the people who are saving for an annuity or a pension for when they retire. If the roll-up rate is going down, aside from working longer, the only solution is to save more.“
    Wir haben aber auch Disinflation. Es kommt also darauf an, welcher Effekt dominiert. Thorsten Polleit bekommt die Zinsproblematik überhaupt nicht auf die Reihe: http://wirtschaftlichefreiheit.de/wordpress/?p=19500. Das dürfte nicht unkommentiert bleiben.

    LG Michael Stöcker

    Antworten
    • Dietmar Tischer says:

      >Wir haben aber auch Disinflation.>

      Das ist richtig.

      >Es kommt also darauf an, welcher Effekt dominiert.>

      Nein.

      Es kommt darauf an, wie Disinflation INTERPRETIERT wird.

      Wenn die Menschen meinen, dass Disinflation nicht etwas ist, das ihre Geldersparnisse schont und ihnen daher mehr Kaufkraft verleiht, sondern etwas, das sie nominal weniger wachsen lässt aufgrund tieferer Zinsen, dann sparen sie eben mehr.

      Meine Vermutung ist, dass sie letzteres meinen.

      Antworten
  4. Dietmar Tischer says:

    @ Michael Stöcker

    > „Für das, um was es hier geht, spielt das keine Rolle, ebenso wenig wie es eine Rolle spielt, welche Ziele mit Helikoptergeld erreicht werden sollen.“

    Da bin ich entschieden anderer Meinung.>

    Wenn Sie das sind, weichen Sie der Kontroverse aus.
    Die ist, ob das, was W. White sagt, KOKOLORES ist, wenn er dem Ergebnis nach nichts anderes als ich sage, nämlich, dass Helikoptergeld „terminal risky“ sein kann.

    Wenn Sie Ihre Auffassung von Kokolores aufrechterhalten wollen, müssen Sie argumentieren, dass es die Möglichkeit von „terminal risky“ nicht geben kann.

    Es ist SINNLOS mit Ihnen zu diskutieren, wenn Sie das nicht tun.

    Was W. White betrifft, lege ich Ihnen – in Interpretation seiner Auffassung – einmal dar, was Sie KONKRET widerlegen müssen.

    W. White:

    „My own personal view – and I have to say that I hope I’m wrong – is that it is a highly risky and perhaps even terminally risky policy for countries that already have bad fiscal conditions. We should be thinking about the downsides.“

    Heißt (so wie ich ihn verstehe):

    Wenn Helikoptergeld ERFOLGREICH ist mit der Schaffung hinreichend mehr Nachfrage, dann wird es zu Preissteigerungen (nicht Hyperinflation) kommen und damit auch zu höheren Zinsen. Höhere Zinsen können hochverschuldeten Staaten in die Insolvenz treiben, Das ist dann der Fall, wenn sie den Schuldendienst nur noch mit noch mehr Verschuldung leisten können. Diese Situation gibt es regelmäßig bei hochverschuldeten Staaten.

    Widerlegen Sie doch einmal, warum dies nicht sein kann – NICHT KANN!

    Ich halte diese Auffassung realitätsbezogen nicht für falsch, aber widerlegbar, wenn man – wie beim hypothetischen Fall japanischer Staat/BoJ – einbezieht, dass mit Helikoptergeld die Staatsverschuldung FAKTISCH auf null gebracht werden kann durch endlos laufende „Anleihen“ mit einem „Zinscoupon“ von null.

    Das könnten Sie gegen W. White vorbringen.

    Weil man das vorbringen kann, argumentiere ich mit der REALWIRTSCHAFTLICHEN Situation, die durch Helikoptergeld auch bei DIESER Widerlegung nicht auszuschließen ist, dass nämlich die durch Helikoptergeld VERHINDERTE Anpassung auf der Angebotsseite zu Inflation führt, die letztlich in Hyperinflation enden kann.
    Sie mögen das funktional anders sehen, können aber „terminal risky“ NICHT ausschließen, wenn Sie sagen:

    Hohe regelmäßige Beträge bei erodierender produktiver Basis führen sehr wahrscheinlich in die Hyperinflation.

    Nichts anderes sage ich, mit der Begründung, dass es REGELMÄSSIGE HOHE Beträge geben wird, weil diese SITUATIONSBEDINGT die jeweils kostengünstigste Lösung für den Staat bzw. die Gesellschaft ist – so wie kontinuierliche MEHRVERSCHULDUNG in der Vergangenheit die kostengünstigste, weil konfliktvermeidende Lösung war.

    >Ich plädiere für kleine Beträge, die zudem unter Berücksichtigung des persönlichen Grenzsteuersatzes ausgezahlt werden sowie für eine deutlich höhere post mortem Besteuerung.>

    PLÄDIEREN können Sie für vieles.

    Das RISIKO können sie damit aber nicht ausschließen, weil sich reales HANDELN an kein Plädoyer hält, wenn es eine kurzfristige günstigere Lösung gibt.

    Wenn das soweit geklärt, oder von mir aus auch anders zu Ende gedacht ist, kann man angesichts ERKANNTER Risiken diese Risiken AKZEPTIEREND sich auch für den Einsatz von Helikoptergeld entscheiden.

    Oder man akzeptiert die Risiken nicht und ist daher gegen den Einsatz von Helikoptergeld.

    Das ist dann das Ende der Diskussion.

    Man kann dann nur noch darauf verweisen, dass jeder die KONSEQUENZEN seiner Position akzeptieren sollte.

    Antworten
    • Michael Stöcker says:

      „Wenn Sie das sind, weichen Sie der Kontroverse aus.“

      Ich bin es.

      „Wenn Sie Ihre Auffassung von Kokolores aufrechterhalten wollen, müssen Sie argumentieren, dass es die Möglichkeit von „terminal risky“ nicht geben kann.“

      Muss ich nicht. Es reicht aus, dass ich dies für äußerst unwahrscheinlich halte. Die Gründe hierfür habe ich benannt.

      „Es ist SINNLOS mit Ihnen zu diskutieren, wenn Sie das nicht tun.“

      Die von Ihnen angezettelte Diskussion ist sinnlos, da Sie sich mal wieder um des Kaisers Bart streiten wollen.

      LG Michael Stöcker

      Antworten

Hinterlassen Sie einen Kommentar

Wollen Sie an der Diskussion teilnehmen?
Feel free to contribute!

Schreibe einen Kommentar

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind mit * markiert.

Bitte das Captcha ausfüllen * Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA.