James Montier entpuppt sich als Anhänger von MMT

James Montier vom Bostoner Vermögensmanager GMO habe ich bei bto schon öfter zitiert. Er ist meines Erachtens einer der klügsten Beobachter von Wirtschaft und Finanzmärkten. In einem Interview mit Barrons äußert er sich zur – keineswegs – „Modernen“ Monetary Theory (MMT).

Zunächst erklärt er die Eckpunkte von MMT:

  • MMT can be decomposed into a few simple statements. One, money exists because it’s created by the state. The U.S. dollar has value because you have to pay taxes in it. (…) Two, if a country issues debt in its own currency and has a floating exchange rate, it is monetarily sovereign and can’t be forced to default on its debt. The U.S., United Kingdom, and Japan fall into that category. The euro zone doesn’t—France issues debt in euros and can’t just print it to repay debt.” – bto: wobei Macron gerade mit voller Kraft dabei ist – und mit seinen durchschlagenden Erfolgen bei der Besetzung der Spitzenpositionen der EU und beim IWF erfolgreich – diese Einheit von Geldpolitik und Staat auch in der Eurozone herzustellen, verbunden mit einer durchaus willkommenen Umverteilung Richtung Frankreich. Wir gehen dabei freiwillig in den Status des Tributleisters über, der bereitwillig den eigenen Wohlstand für das große Projekt opfert.  
  • „MMT has a different operational description of the monetary system. ‘Loans create deposits’ is an expression you’ll hear a lot from MMT people. ‘Oh, no, deposits create loans,’ other people say. But the way the world works is: Bankers make a loan, then gather the deposits to offset it, or go collect reserves.“ – bto: Das stimmt bekanntlich. In unserer Geldordnung sind es die privaten Banken, die für die Geldschöpfung stehen. 90 Prozent oder mehr werden im privaten Verschuldungsakt geschaffen.
  • „MMT is aligned with functional finance, which simply says fiscal policy should aim to generate full employmentrather than a balanced budget. (…) you hear from all sorts of policy wonks that the U.S. and XYZ nation are running out of money. Well, that’s just not possible.“ – bto: genauso, wie die Weimarer Republik immer genug Geld hatte, allerdings kam man am Ende mit dem Drucken nicht mehr nach.
  • MMT is very clear about the binding constraints on spending: You don’t have endless supplies of people, machines, factories, and at some point you push demand above productive capacity. That creates inflation.“ – bto: die wiederum auch nicht unwillkommen wäre in einer deflationären Welt wie heute. Wir könnten die Schuldenlast der Privaten gleich mit bewältigen.
  • „Private debt matters. A household can’t print its own money. Therefore, it needs to be able to repay debts. So we should worry about the level of debt that corporations and households have.“ – bto: Das tun wir und auch hier kann die MMT helfen, indem sie zu einer Entwertung des Geldes und damit der Schulden führt.
  • „(…) in macro-accounting, the government’s debt is actually the private sector’s asset. You can reframe national debt as national savings.“ – bto: Klartext, je mehr Schulden der Staat macht, desto reicher werden die Privaten. Vielleicht liegt hier der Grund für die relative Armut der Deutschen?

Dann kommt er zur Begründung, weshalb er ein Befürworter (!) von MMT ist:

  • „The crystallizing moment was my biggest-ever investing mistake, in 1995, in Tokyo, when I wrote that, at 3%, Japanese bond yields couldn’t go any lower. I watched them halve, halve, and halve again. Suddenly, they were at 50 basis points [0.5%]. (…) I’d used the standard tools of economics and debt sustainability that neoclassical economics trots out. I began to think about alternative frameworks. What offers more insight into understanding the world? MMT won hands down.“ – bto: wobei Japan nun nicht als Erfolg von MMT herhalten kann – oder?
  • Larry Summers (said) ‘Contrary to claims of modern monetary theorists, it is not true that governments can simply create new money to pay all liabilities coming to you and avoid default, as the experience with any number of emerging markets demonstrates. Past a certain point, this approach leads to hyperinflation.’ But, in 2014, he said that the U.S. has a ‘currency we print ourselves, and that fundamentally changes the nature of the macroeconomic dynamics in our country, and all analogies between the U.S. and Greece are, in my judgment, deeply confused.’ You can’t say both those things. He was the most intellectually dishonest of the various critics that I saw.“ – bto: Ohnehin kann man Summers gut kritisieren. Er ist bekanntlich Begründer der Theorie der säkularen Stagnation, die er auf zu viele Ersparnisse zurückführt, ohne den Elefanten im Raum, die zu hohe staatliche und private Verschuldung zu erwähnen. Das ist meines Erachtens einer der größten Fehler in der Diskussion.
  • „(…) cash and bonds are not vastly different instruments (…) Bonds are really just deferred cash. You are paid a return for your willingness to hold them. When governments run deficits, they’re spending more than they’re receiving. The government transfers money from its bank account to the bank account of whoever’s goods or services it’s buying. That creates reserves at the bank of the person who is providing the service. Banks don’t like holding reserves, so it lends them on the interbank market. Ultimately, that government deficit puts downward pressure on interest rates.“ –bto: Dazu empfehle ich den sehr guten Aufsatz von Montier zu den Staatsdefiziten, den ich auch in meinem Märchenbuch zitiert habe. (→ Staatsschulden – wirklich so schlecht?). Es wird zu wenig verstanden, dass zunehmende Verschuldung zu tieferen Zinsen führen muss, weil das Geld immer mehr wird.
  • Look at Japan, which has had huge deficits, and where have interest rates gone? To zero. Oddly, fiscal deficits are actually good news from an equity point of view. The Kalecki equation says that corporate profits at the macro level are the result of net investment, plus dividends, minus various sectors’ savings. If the government is saving, or households are saving, that’s a drag. If governments are actually running deficits, it’s a boost to profits. This is interesting and not widely understood.“ – bto: Das führt zu der Frage, warum die deutschen Zinsen so stark sinken, obwohl wir alle sparen, statt mehr Schulden zu machen. Die Antwort dürfte darin liegen, dass die anderen Schulden machen und Geld schaffen, das dann aber zum sichersten Schuldner fließt. Das ist die Folge von Euro und freien Kapitalmärkten.
  • „Why the hell have wages been so damned slow and low for so long? It has a lot to do with what one would call monopsony,or the power of a single buyer, rather than monopoly, the power of a single seller. Monopsony is what we’ve seen in the labor market. There are fewer new firms being created. It has translated into corporate power against labor, rather than corporate power against the consumer. That helps explain very low wage growth over time, despite a very long expansion.“ – bto: Das wiederum ist eine sehr interessante Argumentation. Denn wenn man sich die USA ansieht, bekommt man doch den Eindruck, dass es gerade dort zu einer wahren Flut an Neugründungen kommt. Diese sind aber meist nicht sehr personalintensiv und die Mitarbeiter sind hoch qualifiziert.
  • „A group of sectors, like manufacturing and information, are doing fine, with reasonable productivity and output growth, but have held down wages. Then there’s another group, construction and health care, where there has been essentially no productivity growth and no real wage growth. That’s an unhealthy combination—and (…) gives rise to the degree of inequality we observe. An awful lot of the gains of economic expansion are captured by the top 10% rather than by the majority.“ – bto: Das würde ich aber auch auf die Zombifizierung der Wirtschaft in Folge der hohen Verschuldung und des immer billigeren Geldes zurückführen.
  • „(…) another lesson from the MMT framework, is that private debt matters. If I’m Apple, I can issue bonds at 1%. The problem is that everyone’s doing that at the same time. (…) It’s perfectly rational for individual companies, but a huge amount of corporate debt creates a systemic vulnerability. Half of the outstanding corporate debtis now rated the lowest investment grade, which really is quite worrying. At some stage, we’ll encounter a downturn. As an equity investor, you’re junior to this paper that needs to be paid.“ –bto: Das Problem der hohen Unternehmensverschuldung in den USA habe ich an dieser Stelle immer wieder diskutiert. Neue Zahlen zeigen seit Jahren stagnierende Gewinne, nur durch alternative Gewinndefinitionen und Aktienrückkäufe (auf Kredit!) wurden steigende Gewinne suggeriert.
  • The market should trade on a cyclically adjusted price/earnings measure of about 17½ times, not the 28 times the S&P 500 trades at today. The U.S. market remains far and away the most expensive market in the world. (…) All I know is that when things are priced to perfection, any shortfall leads to rapid repricing. It’s second-guessing the herd.Das Problem der hohen Unternehmensverschuldung in den USA habe ich an dieser Stelle immer wieder diskutiert. Neue Zahlen zeigen seit Jahren stagnierende Gewinne, nur durch alternative Gewinndefinitionen und Aktienrückkäufe (auf Kredit!) wurden steigende Gewinne suggeriert.“ – bto: Wiederum stimme ich überein. Das Problem ist nur, dass das nun schon seit Jahren andauert und es schwer ist, den Zeitpunkt für eine Wende vorherzusagen.
  • It’s incredibly hard to build portfolios today. Some assets can give you really quite attractive rates of return, at least in expectation. And you should own them. These would be emerging market value stocks. They’re hairy, they’re scary, they’re often terrible companies in terrible countries, but they trade on single-digit P/Es, which makes for a big margin of safety. (…) Will they beat the S&P 500 over the next 12 months? I have no idea. Will they do it over the next decade? Absolutely, because the pricing differential is huge. The U.S. is on a Shiller P/E of nearly 30 times, emerging markets are at 14 times, and emerging markets value stocks are even cheaper.” – bto: wie beispielsweise die russischen Aktien.  

→ barrons.com(Anmeldung erforderlich): „Why a GMO Strategist Is Bearish on U.S. Stocks but Positive on Modern Monetary Theory“, 25. Juli 2019

18 Kommentare
  1. Avatar
    KBX sagte:

    Solange die Staatsschuld als Collateral akzeptiert wird, ist das kein Problem – irgendwann ist aber ein Punkt erreicht, an dem inkrementell zuwenig Nachfrage nach Staatspapier da ist (bzw. mehr zurückzuzahlen ist, als Papier gekauft wird). Was dann? Irgendwer hat dann mit dem Papier, das keine Deckung hat, den schwarzen Peter (und hat damit reale Ressourcen gegen Wertloses getauscht). Der Traum für nichts etwas zu bekommen, funktioniert nicht…

    Antworten
  2. Avatar
    Dietmar Tischer sagte:

    >bto: Klartext, je mehr Schulden der Staat macht, desto reicher werden die Privaten. Vielleicht liegt hier der Grund für die relative Armut der Deutschen?>

    Die Privaten reicher, relative Armut der Deutschen?

    Sind die Privaten keine Deutschen?

    Die relative Armut der Deutschen hat folgenden Grund:

    Die z. T. fehlende Möglichkeit und der weit verbreitete fehlende Wille, mit produktiven Sachwerten Vermögen zu bilden.

    >bto: Ohnehin kann man Summers gut kritisieren. Er ist bekanntlich Begründer der Theorie der säkularen Stagnation, die er auf zu viele Ersparnisse zurückführt, ohne den Elefanten im Raum, die zu hohe staatliche und private Verschuldung zu erwähnen. Das ist meines Erachtens einer der größten Fehler in der Diskussion.>

    Man mag es ein Defizit nennen, von mir aus auch einen Fehler, dass die vermeintliche oder tatsächliche hohe staatliche und private Verschuldung in der DISKUSSION nicht auftaucht.

    Nur:

    Wird DADURCH Summers These zur säkularen Stagnation FALSCH?

    Mitnichten.

    Die Empirie belegt, dass zu wenig nachgefragt wird (= zu viel Ersparnisse) und DESHALB (Folge) zu wenig investiert wird und die Zinsen gefallen sind.

    Es ist doch nicht so, dass die Privaten (privaten Haushalte und die Unternehmen) dem Staat Geld geborgt haben, und es ihnen DESHALB gefehlt hat, SELBST für eine hinreichende Nachfrage zu sorgen.

    Wenn die Privaten ihre Nachfrage BEFRIEDIGT haben, geben sie dem Staat Geld – erst DANN (immer noch richtig, aber nicht mehr durchgängig so; gespart wird auch aus Angst vor Altersarmut)

    Außerdem kann sich der Staat IMMER, aber freilich nicht in beliebiger Menge über die Geld schöpfenden Banken verschulden.

    Hier eine verständliche Darlegung, speziell auch mit Blick auf die EZB und die unterschiedlichen Auffassungen von M. Stöcker und Dr. Stelter (aufgrund auch von mitunter unscharfer Formulierungen):

    https://www.welt.de/wirtschaft/article199536158/Thomas-Straubhaar-ueber-Negativzinsen-Die-EZB-ist-eher-Opfer-als-Taeter.html

    >Es wird zu wenig verstanden, dass zunehmende Verschuldung zu tieferen Zinsen führen muss, weil das Geld immer mehr wird„Why the hell have wages been so damned slow and low for so long? …There are fewer new firms being created.>

    Das ist falsch.

    Richtig ist, dass die Nachfrage nach HOCHBEZAHLTEN Arbeitsplätzen in der Güterproduktion abgenommen und die für vergleichsweise gering bezahlte in den Dienstleistungsbranchen zugenommen hat.

    Das gilt insbesondere für USA, für Deutschland NOCH nicht mit den Auswirkungen wie in USA.

    Hauptgrund ist die Globalisierung mit der Migration von Arbeitsplätze schaffenden Investitionen von den entwickelten Volkswirtschaften in die sich entwickelnden mit deutlich GERINGEREN Arbeitskosten.

    Zur Frage:

    WARUM ist J. Montier Anhänger von MMT?

    Deshalb:

    >„(…) another lesson from the MMT framework, is that private debt matters… It’s perfectly rational for individual companies, but a huge amount of corporate debt creates a systemic vulnerability. Half of the outstanding corporate debtis now rated the lowest investment grade, which really is quite worrying. At some stage, we’ll encounter a downturn. As an equity investor, you’re junior to this paper that needs to be paid.“At some stage, we’ll encounter a downturn.>

    Heißt im Klartext:

    J. Montier ist für MMT, weil damit das Anlegerrisiko, das hoch verschuldete Unternehmen darstellen, zu vermeiden ist – dank MMT würde sich die Partie für GMO und seine Kunden unbeschwert fortsetzen lassen.

    Wenn das die Begründung für eine Präferenz von MMT ist und eine Publikation wie barrons diese Auffassung veröffentlicht, muss man sich wirklich ernsthafte Sorgen um die Verschuldung der Unternehmen machen – und über die Interessen staunen, die sich mittlerweile hinter MMT versammeln.

    Antworten
      • Avatar
        Dietmar Tischer sagte:

        @ Horst

        Stimme mit Ihnen überein, dass Ihr Zitat zeigt, dass Straubhaar FALSCH liegt, was die Geldschöpfung betrifft.

        Die Banken sind zwar auch Intermediäre, weil die Summe auf den Konten und Sparbüchern ihr Kreditangebote BEEINFLUSSEN.

        Sie sind es aber definitiv nicht dem Verständnis nach, dass derartige Summen der Nachfrage nach Krediten als ANGEBOTE gegenüber stehen und damit über die Kreditvergabe (Geldschöpfung) ENTSCHEIDEN.

        Straubhaar liegt aber argumentativ richtig, wenn er sich an die Seite von Summers stellt.

        Er liegt richtig, weil die EMPIRIE dafür spricht, nämlich – wie er sagt – „der aktuelle empirische Wissensstand … jenen recht gibt, die langfristig sinkende oder gar negative Zinsen als Folge von fundamentalen demografischen und technologischen Transformationsprozessen verstehen, die wenig bis nichts mit Geldpolitik zu tun haben.“

        Diese Transformationsprozesse haben REALE Grundlagen, die eine Geldpolitik nicht schaffen kann.

        Dass z. B. die Geburtenrate gefallen ist, hat u. a. mit der Pille zu tun, aber nichts mit der Geldpolitik.

        Wer gegenteiliger Meinung ist, muss erklären, wie die Geldpolitik im Schlafzimmer agiert.

        Dazu habe ich bis heute noch nie etwas gehört.

  3. Avatar
    Susanne Finke-Röpke sagte:

    bto: „and emerging markets value stocks are even cheaper.”

    Richtig.

    Aber wie sicher ist es, dass meine Eigentumsrechte an Schwellenländeraktien von der dortigen Regierung am Unternehmenssitz (ich bin ein ausländischer Aktionär) und von der eigenen Wohnsitzregierung (ich bin ein Kapitalist, der sein Kapital ins „böse“ Ausland bringt statt den heimischen Unternehmen für Investitionen zur Verfügung zu stellen) noch geschützt werden? Der Risikoabschlag, der von bestimmten Märkten vorgenommen wird, ist auch eine Sammlung an subjektiven Prognosen über die Entwicklung des dortigen Rechtssystems. Kapitalverkehrskontrollen, Zwangsumtauschkurse, Änderungen im Steuerrecht, Enteignungen, etc. in Bezug auf den Wohnsitz der potentiellen Aktionäre.

    Aktuelle Beispiele im Vergleich zu vor 5 Jahren: Hongkong (kein emerging market, aber gewaltsamer Systemwechsel durch chinesische Volksarmee inzwischen denkbar), Türkei (offene massive Staatsfinanzierung durch die Notenbank inzwischen denkbar), Argentinien (Währungskontrollen), Mexiko (Trumps Ideen), Russland (Sanktionserweiterungen drohen), usw.

    Länder, die keinerlei Rechtsstaatstradition haben und aufgrund des Drucks der USA Aktienmärkte nach westlichem Vorbild eingeführt haben, können diese in Krisen gerade für Ausländer auch sehr schnell wieder abriegeln bzw. Aktionäre enteignen.

    Antworten
    • Avatar
      Richard Ott sagte:

      @Frau Finke-Röpke

      Also ich würde eher in Russland investieren als in Berlin, das Enteignungsrisiko in Berlin schätze ich mittlerweile deutlich höher ein…

      Wenn Sie Ihre Investments in Ländern machen, wo Sie sich zumindest prinzipiell vorstellen könnten, dort auch zu leben und die Dividenden in der Landeswährung buchtäblich aufzuzehren anstatt sie in Euros zu konvertieren, dann können Sie die Währungsrisiken alle gelassener sehen – die politischen Risiken sind ein anderes Thema.

      Antworten
      • Avatar
        Susanne Finke-Röpke sagte:

        @Herrn Richard Ott:

        Ich verstehe Ihr Argument, aber ich habe nicht ohne Grund von zwei Länderrisiken gesprochen: dem Land der Investition (hier: Russland) und dem des Investors (hier: Deutschland). Deutschland hat in den letzten 220 Jahren drei Mal Russland militärisch bedroht. Wenn die Russen eines gelernt haben, dann vor Deutschen auf der Hut zu sein. Ich wäre mir keineswegs sicher, ob ich als Deutsche in 10 Jahren in Russland willkommen sein werde, wenn in einer Weltschuldenkrise (margin call) auf einmal etliche Länder anfangen, Sündenböcke zu suchen und man Auseinandersetzungen noch gröberer Art beginnt. Denn dann wird man angesichts seines Passes oder seiner Herkunft schnell in „Sippenhaft“ für seine Abstammung genommen.

        Einfach mal je nach Sprachkenntnis „Российские немцы“ googlen, alternativ auch gerne „Wolgadeutsche“ oder „Wolhyniendeutsche“.

      • Avatar
        Richard Ott sagte:

        @Frau Finke-Röpke

        „Deutschland hat in den letzten 220 Jahren drei Mal Russland militärisch bedroht.“

        Grundsätzlich stimmt das (wobei ich bezweifle, dass die von Napoleon dominierten Rheinbundstaaten eine andere Wahl hatten als am Russlandfeldzug 1812 teilzunehmen; Österreich und Preußen hätten sich vielleicht erfolgreich widersetzen können und wären dann selbst angegriffen worden) – und dann wurde die Atombombe erfunden, was weitere militärische Eskalationen doch eher unwahrscheinlich macht.

        „Wenn die Russen eines gelernt haben, dann vor Deutschen auf der Hut zu sein.“

        Vorsicht, jetzt wird es wieder politisch:

        Das ist ein Klischee – oder vielleicht auch nur die westdeutsche Perspektive. Tatsächlich haben die Russen eher gelernt, dass es alle möglichen Sorten von Deutschen gibt, manche mit denen man sehr gut zusammenarbeiten kann (wenn man als Russe will, man muss ja nicht) und andere mit denen das nicht geht. Außerdem hat der Westen nach 1990 viele Zusagen an Russland nicht eingehalten und geostrategisch hat sich Deutschland eher als rückgratloser Vasall der USA verhalten anstatt als eigenständiger Staat der seine eigenen strategischen Interessen sinnvoll umsetzt. Der Wille zur Zusammenarbeit war daher von russischer Seite schon mal deutlich stärker ausgeprägt als jetzt — erinnern Sie sich an die Putin-Rede auf deutsch im Bundestag im Jahr 2001: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dEMQs2v8rNc

        „wenn in einer Weltschuldenkrise (margin call) auf einmal etliche Länder anfangen, Sündenböcke zu suchen und man Auseinandersetzungen noch gröberer Art beginnt. Denn dann wird man angesichts seines Passes oder seiner Herkunft schnell in ‚Sippenhaft‘ für seine Abstammung genommen.“

        Auch als reicher Investor oder Privatier mit Investments in dem Land? Das halte ich grundsätzlich für unwahrscheinlich, es sei denn, man hält sich in einem Land auf, das ein totalitäres politisches System hat, dann ist es durchaus möglich. Bei den Kommunisten vom chinesischen Festland oder der immer islamistischer werdenden Erdogan-Diktatur in der Türkei zu investieren, wäre mir perönlich zu heiß. Dann lieber Mexico, Argentinien oder Russland, da kann man zur Not noch die Politiker oder die Polizei oder die Kartelle bestechen wenn man Ärger hat, bei Betonkommunisten oder Hardcore-Islamisten ist das im Konfliktfall vermutlich nicht mehr möglich und beide Ideologien sind auch eher für Brutalität als für Kompromissfähigkeit bekannt.

    • Avatar
      troodon sagte:

      @ SFR
      Zustimmung !

      Dazu möchte ich noch ergänzen, dass die Bewertung von Aktienmärkten eben nicht unabhängig von den Wachstumsaussichten erfolgt. Geringe Wachstumsaussichten gehen meist einher mit niedrigeren KGV’s.

      „bto: wie beispielsweise die russischen Aktien. “
      Ja, russische Aktien sind auch aus meiner Sicht eine sinnvolle (kleine) Beimischung. Aber das KGV „muss“ aufgrund der Wirtschaftsstruktur eben auch DEUTLICH niedriger sein, als das KGV von einer Gruppe deutlich wachsender Unternehmen.

      Und da im Post wieder auf das Shiller KGV verwiesen wird, sollte man auch das aktuelle KGV für den S+P 500 von rd. 22 zur Kenntnis nehmen. THEORETISCHE Aktienrendite somit 110/KGV= rd.4,5%.
      https://www.multpl.com/s-p-500-pe-ratio
      Klar, das ist definitiv historisch gesehen hoch. insbesondere, da die Gewinne durch financial engineering zusätzlich künstlich erhöht ausgewiesen sind.
      Aber sind deshalb die US-Aktien Bewertungen gesichert unhaltbar hoch, wenn man gleichzeitig für 10-jährige US Staatsanleihen nur rd. NOMINAL 1,5% p.a erhält ?

      Für mich ist das keine ausgemachte Sache.

      Somit würde ich auf den großen Einbruch als die wahrscheinlichste Entwicklung (weiterhin noch) nicht wetten. Flexibilität und Schnelligkeit sind weiterhin angesagt.

      Antworten
  4. Avatar
    Alexander sagte:

    > MMT is aligned with functional finance, which simply says fiscal policy should aim to generate full employmentrather than a balanced budget. (…) you hear from all sorts of policy wonks that the U.S. and XYZ nation are running out of money. Well, that’s just not possible

    Deutschland der Weimarer Republik hatte den ersten Weltkrieg verloren und Zimbawe war keine Supermacht. Der Vergleich zur EU oder USA hinkt um Größenordnungen.

    Trotz aller Kriege und dem weltgrößten Militärhaushalt, der nur der hälfte des US Haushaltsdefizits entspricht, kommt keine gefährliche Inflation in Gang….weil wir alle dagegen bürgen, mit jedem Export der unsere Wirtschft erhält.

    Zimbawe als Teil der EU und Hyperinflation ist ausgeschlossen.

    Das Vertrauen der US Bürger in ihren Dollar spielt keine Rolle und Inflation durch Vertrauensentzug der Weltbevölkerung ist ausgeschlossen, solange die USA Supermacht sind.

    Allein die Wechselwirkungen aus Tilgung von US Dollar-Auslands-krediten auf die Währungsreserven lokaler ZB wären verheerend, bei einer Flucht aus dem Dollar. Anstelle die USA zu beschädigen, vernichtet die Flucht ihre Schuldner – vgl. schwerste Wirtschaftskrise Brasiliens seit 1945, nach der Abwertung wg. Zinserhöhung durch die FED im Jahr 2015.

    Inflation ist nicht zu befürchten sondern der Kollaps unsinkbarer Geldsysteme an den Folgen dieser Form von Sozialismus……

    Antworten
    • Avatar
      Richard Ott sagte:

      @Alexander

      „Das Vertrauen der US Bürger in ihren Dollar spielt keine Rolle und Inflation durch Vertrauensentzug der Weltbevölkerung ist ausgeschlossen, solange die USA Supermacht sind.“

      Und Sie glauben, dass die USA immer Supermacht bleiben werden? Eine mutige Prognose. Ich glaube, wir werden noch zu unseren Lebzeiten erleben wie sich das ändert. Und in einem multipolaren globalen politischen System funktioniert MMT viel schlechter weil die Fluchtmöglichkeiten aus der Währung größer sind.

      „Inflation ist nicht zu befürchten sondern der Kollaps unsinkbarer Geldsysteme an den Folgen dieser Form von Sozialismus……“

      Wie soll ein MMT-Geldsystem denn sonst kollabieren wenn nicht durch Hyperinflation? Durch so eine Art „DDR2.0“-Szenario in dem der ruinierte sozialistische MMT-Währungsraum eine Währungsreform macht und einem größeren Wirtschaftsraum beitritt? Das könnte theoretisch gehen, aber wer könnte konkret die Rolle der 1990er-BRD spielen wenn der US-Dollar-Raum so heruntergewirtschaftet ist?

      Antworten
      • Avatar
        Alexander sagte:

        @ Richard Ott

        Es gibt keine Fluchtwährung zum US Dollar, es sei denn Sie wechseln das System und tauschen in Rubel oder chinesische Reminbi. Haben Sie Lust dazu?

        Gold ist Ausweg, aber nur wenn Sie das zu Lebzeiten erneut im Herrschaftsbereich umtauschen und anlegen dürfen. Alternativ über grüne Grenzen wandern und im russisch, chinesisch dominierten Raum anlegen…
        .. für den Schwarzmarkt sind ihre maple leaf zu schade.

        Russland hat nie aufgehört Supermacht zu sein, wegen der Atomwaffen.
        Was glauben Sie wird die USA machen? Ihre >700 Militärbasen schließen?

        Gerade weil es keinen größeren Geldgeber gibt, wie seinerzeit die BRD zur Übernahme der DDR, ist MMT alternativlos unsinkbar.

        Ganz im Gegenteil ist es systemstabilisierend, wenn die Grünen für den Import von US fracking Gas sorgen und Handelssanktionen gegen Russland vertreten. Dafür dürfen diese Parteien auch ihre Experimente in Sachen Energiewende, Gender, CO² Neutralität verfolgen….

        Dass es so bleibt zahlen Sie, Herr Ott, MwSt… und GEZ, aber ändern können Sie es nicht ohne ihre Lebensgrundlage in Frage zu stellen.

        Über Preise können wir den Systemzerfall nicht messen, von daher droht auch an den Börsen nicht DIE Gefahr. Man kann das organisieren, wie es die SNB für ihren schweizer Franken tat.

        Was MMT nicht kann ist Fiktivkapital in rentable Investitionen lenken, die Fehlinvestitionen der Gesellschaft zerstören dieselbe – weil wollen nicht reicht, man muss auch können.

  5. Avatar
    Richard Ott sagte:

    „MMT is aligned with functional finance, which simply says fiscal policy should aim to generate full employment rather than a balanced budget. (…) MMT is very clear about the binding constraints on spending: You don’t have endless supplies of people, machines, factories, and at some point you push demand above productive capacity. That creates inflation.“

    Interessant dass Montier die andere natürliche Begrenzung der MMT-Geldschöpfung gar nicht einfällt: Wenn den anderen Wirtschaftssubjekten der MMT-Zauber zu bunt wird und sie Banknoten oder Bankguthaben in der entsprechenden MMT-Währung nicht mehr halten wollen, dann bricht das ganze System zusammen. Statt Inflation hat man dann plötzlich Hyperinflation. Ob die Kapazitäten an Produktionsmitteln an dem Punkt komplett ausgelastet sind oder nicht, ist völlig egal, weil man sie mit der Hyperinflations-Währung nicht mehr einkaufen kann.

    Und der Staat, der seine Glaubwürdigkeit auf diese Art verspielt hat, bricht dann auch zusammen. Siehe Weimar. Oder Zimbabwe.

    Antworten

Ihr Kommentar

An Diskussion beteiligen?
Hinterlassen Sie einen Kommentar!

Schreibe einen Kommentar

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind mit * markiert.