„Why Angela Merkel Should Be Grateful to Donald Trump“

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInEmail this to someone

Dieser Kommentar erschien beim Globalist:

With Merkel lacking both an agenda and a vision, the US push to deal with Germany’s eternal export surplus is a welcome impetus for long overdue domestic reforms.

Angela Merkel is running again for chancellor of Germany. Although her party might well be punished for her very liberal policies on immigration, chances are that she will end up with voters granting her a fourth term in office in September.

The open question is that of political mechanics: Who will Merkel need as a coalition partner to form yet another government under her leadership?

Whatever her own personal preference, in the end she won’t mind which party (or parties) will be her junior partner.

Why run again?

The far more interesting question is this: Why does Merkel even want to remain chancellor? She is exhausted. Worse, even her biggest supporters agree that she is lacking a vision of what to achieve in this role.

Merkel has talked about the need to advance the digitization of the German economy and society as well as other pressing matters for a long time. Evidently, the issues never caught fire with her.

The oft-called for transformation of society isn’t going anywhere, even though the funds are certainly available – if the political will was there.

Crisis management forever?

To date, Merkel has relied on her ability to be a pragmatist and undertake an endless series of crisis management activities. But whatever the crisis was – be it financial, the eurozone or migration – Merkel has essentially always reacted and not acted.

She has punted, instead of ever laying down a broader vision. At some point – i.e., now – all of that is no longer awe-inspiring. It becomes lame.

As a result, neither of these crises are truly solved: Banks in Europe are still shaky, lacking billions on their balance sheets.

The eurozone is far from rescued and the migration crisis was put under control by Austria and other countries on the so called “Balkan route” (and not so much by Merkel’s unsavory deal with the autocratic Erdogan regime in Turkey).

Plus, almost everybody has an ominous feeling that any of these crises might return with a vengeance at any moment.

Donald Trump as an inspiration for Merkel

Now, Donald Trumps unexpectedly rides to Merkel’s rescue. Of course, this is not happening in any planned fashion.

She clearly is not his favorite politician in the world. There are even signs, not just from his Twitter account, that he despises her.

Mr. Trump’s impact comes from challenging Merkel’s fundamental basis of success: the strength of the German economy. Not that Mrs. Merkel did anything in the last 11 years to strengthen the national economy.

She not only enjoyed the political benefits of the structural reforms undertaken by her predecessor Gerhard Schröder (who lost the elections as a result), but also did much with her benefits-boosting policies to sap the German economy’s remarkable energy.

The German economy as an Achilles heel?

If the German economy were to enter into difficult waters, the support for Mrs. Merkel would shrink significantly. It would become obvious very rapidly that, under Merkel’s tutelage, the country wasted the good years to prepare for the bad ones.

A direct attack on the German export model poses such a threat. Over the past years, the importance of exports has risen significantly. Nearly 50% of Germany’s GDP is generated by exports.

Germany’s net export surplus amounts to nearly 9% of GDP. This is the highest surplus of all major economies.

There is more to life than exports

While this extraordinary success has a lot to do with the specific structure of the German exports – mainly machinery, equipment and cars – the quality of its products and the work ethics of its labor force, it is also the result of the euro.

The common currency locks Germany’s main trading partners in Europe into a fixed exchange rate regime and the weakness of many of those national economies leads to a low valuation of the euro.

Even worse, it is also a result of a misshaped German economic policy. Running a trade surplus not only reflects what Germany boosters always tell you – that the country offers good products at a good price. The surplus also represents an export of domestic savings as capital is accumulated abroad.

A ready-made plan

Although this might in theory be the right thing to do for an ageing society like Germany, it is clearly not necessary at such a scale.

To make matters worse, German banks are not good investors, which has led to significant losses on Germany’s international investments. (Just remember German banks’ ample involvement in the U.S. subprime crisis.)

The answer to this challenge is straightforward: encourage domestic investment and consumption in Germany. And tax corporations at a higher level. They are not using their cash flows for investments, but rather choose to hoard the money.

Also give more money to consumers by lowering taxes for the lower and middle segment of taxpayers – which are the ones, when they have more cash on hand, that demonstrate a higher propensity to spend it.

And finally, increase public investment to restore Germany’s crippling infrastructure, improve education and build a broadband network on the level long needed.

Trump boosts Merkel

Coming up with such a program might help to tame international criticism of Germany and at the same time benefit Germany. It could well be an agenda for Angela Merkel’s fourth term.

Of course, you might think, that this would just be another crisis. But that’s exactly the point. If the economy as such leaves Merkel cold, the direct attack from Donald Trump and his team on the German economy moves that subject matter into Merkel’s comfort zone – crisis management.

After all, she wouldn’t be handling the economy, but working to improve relations with the United States.

Moreover, this time, it is a crisis that Angela Merkel could really solve, since it just pertains to rejiggering the German economy – and doesn’t really involve other nations’ economic habits.

the Globalist: „Why Angela Merkel Should Be Grateful to Donald Trump“, 3. Februar 2017

3 Antworten
  1. MFK says:

    After all, she wouldn’t be handling the economy, but working to improve relations with the United States.

    Bei dieser Gelegenheit kann sie dann auch gleich noch die Beziehungen zu Polen, Ungarn, Tschechien, Großbritannien, Griechenland, Russland reparieren.

    Antworten
  2. Dietmar Tischer says:

    Es ist falsch, dass Merkel keine Agenda und keine Vision habe.

    Die Analyse des Merkelschen Politikverständnisses ist m. A. n. im Wesentlichen dennoch richtig:

    Sie hat keine Vision – das ist erkennbar richtig – aber eine Agenda:

    >To date, Merkel has relied on her ability to be a pragmatist and undertake an endless series of crisis management activities. But whatever the crisis was – be it financial, the eurozone or migration – Merkel has essentially always reacted and not acted … instead of ever laying down a broader vision.>

    Richtig ist auch, wie das wahrgenommen wird:

    >At some point – i.e., now – all of that is no longer awe-inspiring. It becomes lame.>

    Das ist ihr vielleicht größtes Handicap bei den bevorstehenden Wahlen, zu denen der Herausforderer mit der bislang höchst erfolgreich vermittelten Vision antritt, dass die Gesellschaft mit Umverteilung gerechter und zukunftsfähiger zu machen sei.

    Auch richtig ist eine Konsequenz der Merkelschen Politik:

    >As a result, neither of these crises are truly solved …>

    Diese Feststellung muss man nicht, kann man aber als Kritik auffassen.

    Wäre sie berechtigt?

    Sie wäre NUR dann berechtigt, wenn die Krisenlösungen möglich gewesen wären, OHNE dass es zu INSTABILITÄTEN gekommen wäre, und das, so wie die Dinge nun einmal liegen, nicht nur in Deutschland, sondern darüber hinaus in Europa und möglicherweise der Welt.

    Wer keinen REALISTISCHEN Lösungsweg für die nachhaltige Krisenbewältigung ohne deutlich erhöhtes Stabilitätsrisiko darlegen kann, hat keine Position, die Merkelsche Agenda des reaktiven Krisenmanagements zu kritisieren. Wohlgemerkt: Es handelt sich hier um Krisen, die ursächlich nicht allein Deutschland zuzuschreiben sind und somit auch der ENTSTEHUNG nach national nicht zu verhindern wären.

    Kritik an Merkel ist dennoch angebracht:

    > … under Merkel’s tutelage, the country wasted the good years to prepare for the bad ones.>

    Denn ihre Agenda reaktiver Krisenlösung schließ nicht aus, dass sie national andere Schwerpunkte hätte setzen können, etwa solche wie unter „A ready-made plan“ dargelegt.

    Über die Maßnahmen im Einzelnen kann man diskutieren:
    Darüber, dass in die Infrastruktur investiert werden muss, vor allem in Bildung, aber auch Straßen und Digitalisierung, dürfte weitgehender Konsens herrschen.

    >And tax corporations at a higher level. They are not using their cash flows for investments, but rather choose to hoard the money.>

    Hier würde ich ein großes Fragezeichen setzen. Wenn man mehr private Investitionen in Deutschland haben will, muss man sie ATTRAKTIVER machen, z. B. durch erhöhte Abschreibungen – auch auf F& E – statt mit Besteuerung Anreize zur VERLAGERUNG cash flow generierender Investitionen zu geben.

    >If the economy as such leaves Merkel cold, the direct attack from Donald Trump and his team on the German economy moves that subject matter into Merkel’s comfort zone – crisis management.>

    Das ist ein interessanter Gedanke und ein schlüssiger, weil er auf der Merkelschen Agenda des Krisenmanagements aufsetzt.

    Aber:

    Zum einen bleibt abzuwarten, wie sich die internationale Kritik an Deutschland verschärft. Das letzte Wort zu Trump ist noch nicht gesprochen.

    Zum anderen können gerade die Maßnahmen intern und extern erforderlichen Krisenmanagements, wie die Integration der Flüchtlinge, innere Sicherheit, Sicherung der EU-Außengrenzen, höherer Verteidigungsetat, den finanziellen Spielraum einschränken und dies insbesondere dann, wenn die Kosten der Refinanzierung staatliche Schulden steigen würden.

    Drittens wird Merkel nach Lage der Dinge für ihre nächsten Regierungsjahre auf Koalitionspartner angewiesen sein, die weiter links als sie im Politikspektrum stehen und ihr daher Umverteilung auf Kosten von Investitionen abverlangen werden.

    Viertens:

    Es darf zu keiner Krise kommen, die den deutschen Exportmotor zum Stottern bringt. Ihn sehr schnell wieder in Gang zu bringen, wäre angesichts der Erwartungen in unserer Gesellschaft die erste Priorität jeder deutschen Regierung. Das Risiko einer solchen Krise ist nicht einzuschätzen, aber es ist da.

    Fazit:

    Der Artikel analysiert vieles richtig. Der Anspruch an Merkel ist berechtigt. Die Hürden, an denen die Realisierung scheitern kann, sind hoch und hier weitgehend ausgeblendet worden.

    Antworten
    • Richard Ott says:

      Zu den Vorschlägen einer Unternehmenssteuer-Erhöhung im Artikel: Ich kann auch nicht nachvollziehen, wieso eine solche Steuererhöhung die Investitionen der Unternehmen in Deutschland erhöhen soll. Sind vielleicht im übertragenen Sinn „Investitionen“ in Forschung in Entwicklung gemeint, die größtenteils als Personalaufwendungen verbucht werden und damit den Gewinn mindern? Investitionen in Maschinen und Anlagen sind jedenfalls kein wirksames Mittel um Unternehmenssteuern zu sparen, man kann die Steuerlast damit nur zeitlich verlagern von dem einen Jahr, in dem ein Gewinn anfällt, hin zu dem gesamten Abschreibungszeitraum der Investition. Wenn man tatsächlich die Investitionstätigkeit von Unternehmen in Deutschland über Änderungen im Steuersystem fördern wöllte, dann müsste man die steuerliche Behandlung von Investitionen verändern oder wieder eine Investitionszulage einführen. Ich glaube, eine einfache Unternehmenssteuererhöhung hätte nur die von Herrn Tischer beschriebenen Verlagerungseffekte zur Folge.

      Antworten

Hinterlassen Sie einen Kommentar

Wollen Sie an der Diskussion teilnehmen?
Feel free to contribute!

Schreibe einen Kommentar

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind mit * markiert.

Bitte das Captcha ausfüllen * Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA.