Martin Wolf zu MMT

 Martin Wolf beschäftigt sich in der FT auch mit dem Thema MMT. Liegt ja nahe. Wenig verwunderlich – auch er ist skeptisch:

  • Money is a creature of the state. Modern monetary theory, a controversial account of this truth, is analytically correct, so far as it goes. But where it does not go is crucial: money is a powerful tool, but it can be abused.” – bto: Und das wissen wir nur zu gut aus der Geschichte. Der Staat hat Geld immer wieder missbraucht und die Möglichkeiten dazu kannte schon Goethe.
  • „(The) ideas in Modern Monetary Theory (…) have the following fundamental elements. First, taxes drive money. This doctrine is called ‘chartalism’. Governments can force their citizens to use the money it issues, because that is how people pay their taxes. The state’s money will thus become the money used for domestic transactions.” – bto: Deshalb ist es so interessant, was die Italiener mit den Mini-BOTs machen. Kann man damit Steuern bezahlen, hat man ein neues Geld im Land.
  • „Banks depend upon the government’s bank — the central bank — as lender of last resort. The IOUs of banks — the predominant form of money in today’s economies — are imperfect substitutes for such sovereign money. They are imperfect, because banks may become illiquid or insolvent and so may default. That is why banking crises are common.“ – bto: Auch das spricht gegen eine Privatisierung des Geldes, weil wir dann entsprechend zahlreiche Lender of Last Resort brauchen. Natürlich kann man argumentieren, dass Wettbewerb und Transparenz kontrollierend wirken. Die Erfahrung stützt das meines Erachtens allerdings nicht.  
  • „Second, contrary to conventional wisdom, no mechanical relationship exists between holdings of central bank liabilities by banks (that is, reserves) and creation of bank money. Since the financial crisis, central bank balance sheets and bank reserves have grown hugely, but broader monetary aggregates have not. The explanation is that the dominant driver of the money supply is the (risk-adjusted) profitability of lending, which is high in booms and low in busts. The weakness of credit also explains why inflation has remained low.“ – bto: in Verbindung mit der gesunkenen Umlaufgeschwindigkeit.
  • „Third, governments need never default on loans in their own currency. The government does not need to raise taxes or borrow to pay its way; it is possible for it to create the money it needs. This makes it simple for governments to run deficits, in order to ensure full employment.“ – bto: Bei diesem Punkt von MMT kommt man ins Zweifeln. Es führt dazu, dass unter Umständen zu viel Geld geschöpft wird mit den bekannten Problemen.
  • „Fourth, only inflation sets limits on a government’s ability to spend. But, if inflation emerges, the government has to tighten demand, by raising taxes.“ – bto: Huber hat gezeigt, dass durch Besteuerung das Geld nicht wieder verschwindet, deshalb bleibt es im System und damit auch der Inflationsdruck.
  • Martin Wolf ganz klar: „This analysis is correct, up to a point. (…) A sovereign government can always spend in order to support demand. Again, expansion of the central bank balance sheet does not make high inflation likely, let alone inevitable.“ – bto: Man kann also direkte Geldschöpfung für den Staat betreiben, ohne Inflation zu erzeugen.
  • „What then are the problems with MMT? These are twofold: economic and political. An important economic difficulty, clear from painful western experience in the 1970s, is that it is hard to know where ‘full employment’ lies. (…) A still more important economic mistake is to ignore the expectations that drive people’s behaviour. Suppose holders of money fear that the government is prepared to spend on its high priority items, regardless of how overheated the economy might become. (or they) fear that the central bank has also become entirely subject to the government’s whims (which has happened often enough in the past). They are then likely to dump money in favour of some other asset, causing a collapsing currency, soaring asset prices and booming demand for durables. This may not lead to outright hyperinflation. But it might lead to a burst of high inflation, which becomes entrenched.“ – bto: und vor allem schwer steuerbar, weil es die Umlaufgeschwindigkeit treibt.
  • „If politicians think they do not need to worry about the possibility of default, only about inflation, their tendency may be to assume output can be driven far higher, and unemployment far lower, than is possible without triggering an upsurge in inflation. That happened to many western countries in the 1970s. It has happened more often to developing countries, especially in Latin America. But the economic and social consequences of big spikes in inflation can be very damaging.“ – bto: eben, weil es die Erwartungen oder besser gesagt, dass Vertrauen beeinflusst, und zwar negativ.
  • „(…) in managing a modern monetary economy, one has to avoid two gross errors. One is to rely on private sector demand too much, since that can all too easily end up with highly destructive financial booms and busts. The opposite error is to rely on government-led demand too much, since that may well generate destructive inflation booms and busts. The solution, nearly all of the time, is to delegate the needed discretion to independent central banks and financial regulators.“ – bto: also die Beibehaltung des Status quo. Früher hatte Wolf übrigens für Vollgeld plädiert.
  • „(…) proponents of MMT are right that during a period of structurally feeble private demand (as in Japan since 1990) or a deep slump, a sovereign government must and can act, on its own or in co-operation with the central bank, to offset private weakness. There is then no reason to fear the constraints. It should just go for it.“ – bto: Nur, dazu brauchen wir keine neue Theorie …

→ ft.com (Anmeldung erfordrlich): „States create useful money, but abuse it“, 28. Mai 2019

Kommentare (32) HINWEIS: DIE KOMMENTARE MEINER LESERINNEN UND LESER WIDERSPIEGELN NICHT ZWANGSLÄUFIG DIE MEINUNG VON BTO.
  1. Avatar
    Udo Glittenberg sagte:

    Für alle, die sich sine ira et studio mit MMT befassen möchten, sei hier noch einmal kurz auf Bill Mitchell verwiesen. In zwei gerade erschienenen Blog-Beiträgen beantwortet er die Frage, warum sich – ganz im Gegensatz zu den Mainstream-Ökonomen – vor allem bedeutende Akteure an den Finanzmärkten um ein besonderes Verständnis des MMT-Denkrahmens (framework) bemühen.

    Hier einige kurze Zitate:

    „Last week, I read a briefing note from the Key Private Bank (June 24, 2019) – Modern Monetary Theory: What Should You Know?.

    The Bank provides a range of banking services in the US including wealth management.

    The short note seeks to:

    … make the case for why investors should care about MMT and other potential stimulus measures.“

    „One of the reasons the “sharpest macro investors” didn’t get sucked in by orthodox macroeconomics was that they understood the most basic aggregation in macroeconomics – the relationship between the government (as the currency-issuer) and the non-government (as the currency user).

    This relationship is a core starting point for MMT reasoning.“

    „The work of German economist Wolfgang Stützel in the 1950s on – Balances Mechanics – can be considered a precursor to the modern stock-flow consistent reasoning.

    After all, the sectoral balances are just a way of viewing the national accounts.

    While more recently, the work of Wynne Godley has been important to establishing stock-flow consistency in macroeconomic models, using sectoral flows and their corresponding stocks to advantage, the MMT economists have taken that old framework one step further by distinguishing between vertical and horizontal transactions.

    For basic Modern Monetary Theory (MMT) concepts, please read the following introductory suite of blog posts:

    1. Deficit spending 101 – Part 1 (February 21, 2009).

    2. Deficit spending 101 – Part 2 (February 23, 2009).

    3. Deficit spending 101 – Part 3 (March 2, 2009).

    Vertical transactions are those between the government sector and non-government sector and they are unique (different to horizontal transactions between entities within the non-government sector) because they alone create or destroy net financial assets in the non-government sector.

    A bank loan creates a liability at the same time it creates an asset – nothing net is created.

    However, the impacts of vertical transactions show the unique nature of the currency-issuing capacity of the government.

    While the starting point – sectoral balances framework – is not new, the MMT perspective or interpretation and utilisation is novel.“

    „What we learn from an MMT understanding is that:

    1. A government deficit equals a non-government surplus – dollar-for-dollar. It is not an opinion but an accounting fact.

    2. Such a deficit adds net financial assets (wealth) to the non-government sector. Deficits make us richer.

    3. A government surplus equals a non-government deficit – dollar-for-dollar.

    2. Such a surplus reduces the net financial assets (wealth) to the non-government sector. Surpluses destroy non-government wealth.

    You will never learn that in a mainstream economics course. The mainstream economists can claim they knew MMT all along, or that there is nothing new, but you will never read those propositions in a mainstream textbook or hear them in a standard macroeconomics class.

    Now that might not be a problem if those insights were trivial.

    But, of course, they are not.

    Some of the implications are extremely important.“

    Mehr dazu hier:
    http://bilbo.economicoutlook.net/blog/?p=42640
    http://bilbo.economicoutlook.net/blog/?p=42636

    Antworten
  2. Avatar
    Peter Pan sagte:

    @EMP: zufällig habe ich zu Hause ein ordentliches Spiegelteleskop. Wie ist denn die Planetenkonstellation, bzw. wie werden die Planeten denn – wann genau in den 20er? – zueinander stehen wenn das Krall-Phänomen eintritt? Ich würde mir das gerne mal angucken, vorausgesetzt das Wetter spielt mit. 😉

    Antworten
  3. Avatar
    Jens Happel sagte:

    Ich bin mittleweile sehr skeptisch ob die Geldmenge und Umlaufgeschwindigkeit noch irgendwelche Relevanz für die Steuerung der Inflation hat. QE hat gezeigt, dass die Steigerung der Kredite und damit der Geldmenge (über Umwege, da der Zins verbilligt wird) nicht zur Inflation bei den Waren geführt hat sondern nur zur Assetinflation. Die Geldmenge = Schuldmenge die an den Börsen abseits der Realwirtschaft kreiselt ist mittlerweile um eine vielfaches höcher als die BIPs aller Staaten.

    Das Geld, das an den Börsen kreiselt entzieht sich dem Zugriff aller Staaten. Ob es dem Realgütermarkt zu- oder abfließt kann vielleicht Blackrock entscheiden, aber bestimmt keine einzelne Regierung.

    Entscheidend für die Entwicklung der Inflation sind nicht Kredite sondern die Entwicklung der Löhne. Die Löhne von 90% bis 95% der Menschen bestimmen die Nachfrage. Der Großteil der Löhne wird im Realgütermarkt ausgegeben. Solange die Löhne nicht (ganz grob) stärker steigen als die Produktivitätsfortschritte gibt es keine Inflation. Steigen die Einkommen der oberen 5% wird das Geld nicht für Konsum verwendet sondern größtenteils reinvestiert.

    Da wir seit Jahren eine deutlich stärkere Zunahme bei den oberen 5% haben fehlt dies bei der Nachfrage. Dies führt dazu, dass die Aussichten eher Trübe sind und wenig investiert wird. Und so kommt das Bild dieser Tage zusammen. Kaum steigende Löhne, geringe Invsetitionstätigkeit und kaum noch lohnende Investitionen, also Flucht in die Assets mit der Konsequenz der steigenden Ungleichheit (bei den Vermögen).

    Die Länder versuchen teilweise durch steigende Staatsverschuldung gegen zu steuern, das funzt aber nicht, weil nach einer Umdrehung im Realgütermarkt gleich wieder zuviel Geld bei den oberen 5% landet. Und das ist mein Hauptkritikpunkt an MMT. Ohne Änderung der Spielregeln wird das ganze schöne neue Geld der MMT nur zu kurzfristigem Mehrkonsum führen OHNE die Investitionstätigkeit anzuregen. Damit löst MMT genau gar kein Problem sondern ist nur ein Spiel auf Zeit.

    Außerdem wundere ich mich ein wenig über die harsche Kritik an MMT. In meinen Augen wenden die USA, Japan und viele andere Länder in der EU die MMT doch schon längst an. In sehr vielen relevanten Ländern steigen die Staatsschulden doch seit Jahren an. Man nennt es vielleicht nicht MMT, aber im Grunde ist es nichts anderes.

    MFG Jens Happel

    Antworten
    • Avatar
      Michael Stöcker sagte:

      @ Jens Happel

      „Man nennt es vielleicht nicht MMT, aber im Grunde ist es nichts anderes.“

      Es ist der Spezialfall am ZLB (Nullzinsgrenze). Insofern trifft dies für Euroland und Japan zu, nicht aber für die USA. Hätten wir dauerhaft ein Zinsniveau von Null, dann gäbe es in der Tat keinen Unterschied. Davon ist aber kaum auszugehen. Und aktuell kann sich Deutschland sogar zu negativen Zinsen finanzieren. Da wäre MMT aus fiskalischer Sicht die teurere Variante.

      Die harsche Kritik kommt zudem insbesondere von Seiten der Finanzlobby (Finck, Summers…). Die hätten dann einfach weniger Assets/Staaten, gegen die sie wetten können. Nichts ist aus deren Sicht schlimmer als ein schwankungsfreies Asset; aka Geld. Denn die verdienen ihr Geld insbesondere mit steigenden und fallenden Kursen im weltweiten Umverteilungskasino.

      LG Michael Stöcker

      Antworten
  4. Avatar
    Arda Sürel sagte:

    ‚Again, expansion of the central bank balance sheet does not make high inflation likely, let alone inevitable‘.

    Stellt man sich einen Warenkorb vor, der zur Inflationsmessung herangezogen wird und der – einfach mal phantasiehalber – Finanzanlageinstrumente enthaelt, kann man Preissteigerungen in Bezug auf diese Instrumente beobachten, wenn man die Preise vor einer öffentlichen (z.B. Zentralbank-) intervention mit den Preisen nach dieser Intervention vergleicht. Ohne Intervention europaeischer Stellen laege heute eine griechische Staatsanleihe bei viellicht 35 Cent pro Euro, wohingegen dieselbe Anleihe jetzt lange nach besagter Intervention in irgendeiner Bilanz zu vielleicht 100 Cent pro Euro gebucht ist.

    Preise sind demnach unzweifelhaft gestiegen, die Frage ist nur die Preise wovon und verglichen womit. Und wenn man bestimmte steigende Preise einfach nicht zu Waren des Warenkorbs gehörig definiert, dann hat man keine Inflation.

    Antworten
    • Avatar
      Michael Stöcker sagte:

      @ Arda Sürel

      „Ohne Intervention europaeischer Stellen laege heute eine griechische Staatsanleihe bei viellicht 35 Cent pro Euro, wohingegen dieselbe Anleihe jetzt lange nach besagter Intervention in irgendeiner Bilanz zu vielleicht 100 Cent pro Euro gebucht ist.“

      Dann hat aber zuvor ein deflatorischer Effekt stattgefunden, der die Preise nach unten trieb. Anhand dieses Beispiels kann ich keine Assetinflation feststellen, sondern lediglich eine Rückkehr zum Vorkrisenniveau. Und mit Assetinflation hat das nichts zu tun, sondern mit den politischen Imponderabilien, ob GR & Co. im Euro bleiben oder nicht.

      LG Michael Stöcker

      Antworten
  5. Avatar
    Udo Glittenberg sagte:

    Bei dem Versuch, MMT vor dem Hintergrund üblicher makroökonomischer Denkweisen so einzuordnen, dass sowohl ihre Möglichkeiten, als auch ihre Grenzen sichtbar werden, empfiehlt sich ein Blick auf Michael Pettis: „I never assume things like MMT are articles of faith, and so can be „right“ or ‚wrong“ in and of themselves. MMT claims make sense under certain conditions, and these conditions should be specified. I address some of these issues in my October 19, 2015, entry.“ Mehr dazu hier:
    https://carnegieendowment.org/chinafinancialmarkets/61679
    https://carnegieendowment.org/chinafinancialmarkets/78304

    Antworten
    • Avatar
      ruby sagte:

      Udo, Pettis liest wunderbar.
      Ein Geschichtenerzähler der Bilanzidentität erklärt einen Bilanzierungsgrundsatz, und jemand, der Bilanzierungstheorie mit Praxis in Economic Models bewerten kann, weil er die Aufstellungsregeln samt Definitionen erläutert und klärt. Ein enormer intellektueller Gewinn ist die Verknüpfungsgleichungen zu Keen’s theoretischen Modell offen zulegen um die wirtschaftlichen Realitäten zu zu erkunden.
      Großen Dank für diese Quellen👍👏

      Antworten
  6. Avatar
    Dietmar Tischer sagte:

    M. Wolf:

    >A still more important economic mistake is to ignore the expectations that drive people’s behaviour. Suppose holders of money fear that the government is prepared to spend on its high priority items, regardless of how overheated the economy might become. (or they) fear that the central bank has also become entirely subject to the government’s whims (which has happened often enough in the past)>

    An diesem Punkt kann MMT behaupten:

    Die Regierung kann sehr wohl dafür sorgen, dass die Befürchtungen grundlos sind, weil sie das tun würde, was sie auch nach Auffassung von M. Wolf tun kann, nämlich:

    >… if inflation emerges, the government has to tighten demand, by raising taxes.”>

    Dazu bto:

    >Huber hat gezeigt, dass durch Besteuerung das Geld nicht wieder verschwindet, deshalb bleibt es im System und damit auch der Inflationsdruck.>

    Huber kann das nicht zeigen, weil die Regierung die Mehreinnahmen durch Steuererhöhung sterilisieren kann und sie somit nicht im System bleiben und den Inflationsdruck erhöhen.

    Auf der Ebene des monetären Mechanismus ist MMT insoweit schlüssig.

    Die Regierung wird aber nicht durch Besteuerung den Inflationsdruck rausnehmen.

    Ich habe es im Herdentrieb so beschrieben.

    „Die Menschen werden sagen:

    Wieso denn jetzt mehr Steuern – ihr, an der Regierung, könnt euch doch ganz einfach Geld bei der Zentralbank beschaffen (LEGITIMATION dafür habt ihr doch!), holt es also nicht von uns.

    Inflationserwartung zu hoch, Inflation schon im Anmarsch – deshalb Steuererhöhung?

    Wir spüren auch, dass alles teurer wird, deshalb brauchen wir MEHR Geld, also Steuersenkung und nicht -erhöhung.

    So uneinsichtig banal das auch ist, es wäre bei MMT kein Kraut dagegen gewachsen.“

    Der hier von M. Stöcker verlinkte J. Montier sieht das Problem, ohne es explizit zu benennen.

    Er bietet folgende Lösung an:

    “Fiscal policy should be aimed at generating full employment while maintaining low inflation (rather than, say, achieving a balanced budget position). A Job Guarantee scheme is an example of a useful policy option to effect this outcome (acting like a buffer stock in a commodity market) in the eyes of MMT.”

    Die ARBEITSPLATZGARANTIE soll es also richten.

    Das kann funktionieren und es ist auch bewiesen worden, dass es funktioniert – in der ZENTRALVERWALTUNGSWIRTSCHAFT.

    Der Kapitalstock wird dann so ausgelegt, dass jeder einen Arbeitsplatz hat, die Produktivität spielt keine Rolle und auch nicht die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit.

    MMT kann funktionieren, man muss nur das WIE beim Namen nennen.

    Antworten
    • Avatar
      Richard Ott sagte:

      @Herr Ticher

      Fairerweise muss man aber erwähnen, dass es zum Beispiel in den Planwirtschaften in DDR und Sowjetunion nicht nur eine „Arbeitsplatzgarantie“ gab, sondern auch eine Arbeitspflicht. Und diese Arbeitspflicht wurde gegenüber sogenannten „Gammlern“ und anderen Nichtsleistern auch mit staatlichen Zwangsmaßnahmen durchgesetzt.

      Erzählen Sie das mal den MMT-Sozialisten und der linksgrünen „bedingungsloses Grundeinkommen“-Fraktion, so haben die sich das bestimmt nicht vorgestellt!

      Antworten
    • Avatar
      Christian Anders sagte:

      Arbeitsplatzgarantie? Ich hätte aus logischen Erwägungen gesagt, wenn Fiskalpolitik Inflation macht, kann sie nicht gleichzeitig auch noch für die Arbeitsplätze verantwortlich sein. Das wäre dann – anders als sonst gedacht – die Geldpolitik.

      Warum man die Quadratur des Kreises mit so einer Garantie schaffen will, leuchtet mir nicht ein.

      Antworten
      • Avatar
        Dietmar Tischer sagte:

        @ Christian Anders

        Ich verstehen J. Montier so:

        Die Fiskalpolitik zielt auf Vollbeschäftigung und erreicht diese auch.

        Bei Vollbeschäftigung setzt unabhängig vom Geldsystem folgender Mechanismus ein:

        Die Beschäftigten haben eine höhere Arbeitsplatzsicherheit und mehr Optionen auf einen anderen Arbeitsplatz. Sie können und werden daher Lohnerhöhungen durchsetzen. Mit den Lohnerhöhungen steigt die Nachfrage, der aber bei Vollbeschäftigung kein höheres Güterangebot gegenüberstehen kann. Also: Inflation.

        Der Staat will und muss nach J. Montier die Inflation aber im Zaum halten.

        Es gelingt ihm dadurch, dass er dem Wirtschaftskreislauf durch Besteuerung Geld entzieht.

        Dadurch kühlt die Wirtschaft ab und Menschen werden entlassen.

        Um das zu verhindern, gibt es eine Arbeitsplatzgarantie.

        Das ist natürlich denk- und machbar.

        ABER:

        Das setzt ein anderes INSTITUTIONELLES Gefüge voraus.

        Das wäre z. B. der Fall, wenn sich der Staat über Besteuerung oder sonst wie 100% des Inlandsprodukts aneignet hätte.

        Er könnte als Eigner der Betriebe eine Arbeitsplatzgarantie nicht nur versprechen, sondern sie auch durchsetzen.

        In einem marktwirtschaftlichen System ist es nicht möglich, Arbeitsplatzgarantien zu geben.

        Eine angemessene Analyse und Bewertung von MMT verteufelt es nicht, sondern zeigt auf:

        Wer MMT haben will, MUSS auch eine ganz andere Gesellschaft haben wollen.

        Wollen wir das?

        Das ist die Gretchenfrage.

    • Avatar
      Jens Happel sagte:

      Die FED hat im Gegensatz zur EZB schon lange den Auftrag neben der Inflation auch Wachstum und Arbeitsplätze mit zu berücksichtigen. Sie ist damit wesentlich besser durch die letzte krise gekommen als die EWU.

      Das wäre so eine Art Arbeitsplatzgrantie light. Man muss nicht alles nur schwarz und weiß sehen.

      Antworten
      • Avatar
        Dietmar Tischer sagte:

        @ Jens Happel

        Eine Garantie ist eine Garantie.

        Ein Garantie light gibt es nicht.

  7. Avatar
    Richard Ott sagte:

    „Third, governments need never default on loans in their own currency. The government does not need to raise taxes or borrow to pay its way; it is possible for it to create the money it needs.“

    Jaja, die Zimbabwe-Strategie. Aber spätestens dann, wenn die eigenen Staatsbeamten die wertlosen Papierschnipsel nicht mehr annehmen wollen, „dann isch over“, wie Schäuble mal so schön sagte. Und das obwohl die Regierung mit der Hyperinflationswährung formal immer noch „zahlungsfähig“ ist. Ein Rätsel für jeden echten MMT-Sozialisten.

    Antworten
    • Avatar
      Michael Stöcker sagte:

      „Jaja, die Zimbabwe-Strategie.“

      Einmal mehr lenken Sie mit unpassenden Vergleichen vom eigentlichen Thema ab. Wir sind uns aber sicherlich einig, dass MMT das System der Checks and Balances aushebelt. Aber wo liegt denn Ihrer Ansicht nach das richtige Maß der Staatsverschuldung? Wann sollte sie steigen, wann konstant bleiben und wann fallen? Und das bitte für Euroland und nicht für ein despotisches Drittweltland.

      LG Michael Stöcker

      Antworten
    • Avatar
      Susanne Finke-Röpke sagte:

      @Herrn Richard Ott:

      „Zimbabwe-Strategie“ finde ich zu hart formuliert. Diese hat das Ziel der Staatsausgabe ohne Rücksicht auf irgendetwas (auch nicht auf Hyperinflation). Eine Hyperinflation nimmt die MMT nicht billigend in Kauf. Allerdings ist m.E. eine leichte Verwandtschaft zwischen beiden Strategien nicht ganz zu verleugnen. Genausogut könnte man behaupten, bei Windpocken und Beulenpest bilden sich gleichermaßen Pusteln auf der Haut. Ist grundsätzlich richtig, aber die gesundheitlichen Folgen sind schon noch drastisch unterschiedlich. Ähnlich ist es bei Zimbabwe und MMT bei den volkswirtschaftlichen Folgen.

      Antworten
  8. Avatar
    Michael Stöcker sagte:

    „Money is a creature of the state.”

    Das ist nur der halbe Teil der Wahrheit. Geld ist dualistischer/hybrider Natur: ein Geschöpf der Rechtsordnung sowie privater Interessen. Das spiegelt sich auch in der Geschichte der Zentralbanken wider, die ursprünglich rein privater Natur waren und erst im Laufe der Jahrzehnte mehr und mehr zu staatlichen Institutionen mutierten.

    „bto: Huber hat gezeigt, dass durch Besteuerung das Geld nicht wieder verschwindet, deshalb bleibt es im System und damit auch der Inflationsdruck.“

    Das ist zu unpräzise. Notwendige Voraussetzung dafür, dass das Geld verschwindet, ist ein Haushaltsüberschuss. Hinreichend ist die Geschichte aber erst dann, wenn damit auch das Volumen an Staatsanleihen in den Händen von Geschäftsbanken oder der Zentralbank reduziert wird. Richtig liegt Huber mit seiner Aussage nur in dem Fall, bei dem eine Nichtbank eine fällige Staatsanleihe ausbezahlt bekommt. Und damit Inflationsdruck entsteht, müssten diese Mittel sodann konsumtiv oder investiv verwendet werden.

    „bto: Nur, dazu brauchen wir keine neue Theorie …“

    In der Tat: Die alte heißt: Antizyklische Fiskalpolitik bzw. Keynesianismus.

    Oder mit anderen Worten: It takes two to tango. Diese Ansicht scheint sich auch allmählich im germanischen Supply-side Hardcore-Lager durchzusetzen: https://www.zeit.de/2019/27/neuverschuldung-bund-laender-grundgesetz-oekonomie

    LG Michael Stöcker

    Antworten
    • Avatar
      Horst sagte:

      „Die Höhe der Zinsen spielt dabei grundsätzlich keine Rolle, da die Zinszahlungen via Gewinnausschüttung der Zentralbank wieder an die Haushalte zurückgeführt würden (linke Tasche, rechte Tasche).“

      Wenn das so ist, gilt die Wallace-Neutralität nicht nur für Zinssätze nahe (plus und minus) und bei 0%.

      Sie hätte dann unbeschränkte Gültigkeit. Staatsfinanzierung über die Notenbank erzeugte dann keine spürbaren Inflationseffekte.

      https://www.econbiz.de/Record/the-zero-bound-on-interest-rates-and-optimal-monetary-policy-eggertsson-gauti/10001794960

      Spannend ist, dass Woodford und Eggertsson bereits 2003 diese Arbeit verfassten – in einem gänzlich anders gelagerten Zinsumfeld.

      Antworten
      • Avatar
        Michael Stöcker sagte:

        @ Horst

        „Wenn das so ist, gilt die Wallace-Neutralität nicht nur für Zinssätze nahe (plus und minus) und bei 0%.“

        Bei der Wallace-Neutralität geht es um die Unwirksamkeit von Wertpapierkäufen der Zentralbank auf das Zinsniveau. Insofern ist Ihre Schlussfolgerung völlig korrekt, dass dies unabhängig vom Zinsniveau ist. Mit linker/rechter Tasche hat das aber nichts zu tun.

        „Sie hätte dann unbeschränkte Gültigkeit. Staatsfinanzierung über die Notenbank erzeugte dann keine spürbaren Inflationseffekte.“

        Das ist nun wiederum eine ganz andere Geschichte, die mit den Wertpapierkäufen durch die ZB nichts zu tun hat. Es geht nicht darum, ob die Staatsfinanzierung über die Notenbank erfolgt, sondern um das NIVEAU der Staatsfinanzierung, das auch über den Markt bzw. die Geschäftsbanken erfolgen kann. Das sehen wohl auch die Vertreter von MMT so, da sie das Thema Inflation gerade nicht ignorieren.

        „Spannend ist, dass Woodford und Eggertsson bereits 2003 diese Arbeit verfassten – in einem gänzlich anders gelagerten Zinsumfeld.“

        Da muss ich widersprechen: Die beiden haben ihre Arbeit in exakt dem gleichen Zinsumfeld verfasst. Es war nämlich auf die Situation in Japan gemünzt. Japan ist die Blaupause für reife und alternde Volkswirtschaften. Von daher werden die Zinsen wohl noch lange so niedrig bleiben: https://blog.tagesanzeiger.ch/nevermindthemarkets/index.php/44974/das-bedrohliche-zins-szenario-des-larry-summers/

      • Avatar
        Michael Stöcker sagte:

        Michael Woodford gehört mAn übrigens zu den brillantesten Geldtheoretikern. Er ist einer der wenigen, der tatsächlich die Funktionsweise eines zweistufigen Geldsystems verstanden hat. Nicht umsonst wird er immer wieder von den wichtigsten Zentralbanken dieser Welt eingeladen. Er ist Begründer der Forward-Guidance-Strategie sowie von NGDP-Targeting und hatte sich nach seinem imposanten Paper auf der Jackson Hole Konferenz 2012 bereits 2013 explizit in einem Gespräch mit David Andolfatto für eine stärkere Rolle der Fiskalpolitik ausgesprochen: https://youtu.be/Xbmmd7TQ2Xg?t=850

    • Avatar
      Richard Ott sagte:

      @Investruine

      Je weniger Migranten, desto weniger Bedarf für MMT – zumindest bei der aktuellen Zusammensetzung der in Deutschland ankommenden Migranten mit größtenteils unqualifizierten, wenig integrationswilligen Zuwanderern.

      Nur halb Off-Topic: Ist im islamischen Finanzwesen eigentlich MMT erlaubt?

      Antworten
  9. Avatar
    Eva Maria Palmer sagte:

    Wir haben astrologisch und kondradieff-zyklisch eine Eiszeit (nach Dr.Stelter) erreicht.

    Die Planetenkonstellationen Anfang bis Mitte der 20er Jahre haben eine fatale Übereinstimmung
    mit denen der Weltwirtschafts-Krise 1929.

    Auch sind ähnlich rigorose und volksschädliche Maßnahmen unserer Frankfurter John-Law-.Bad Bank zu erwarten, wie die der Notenbanken Anfang der 1920 er Jahre.

    Die Prognosen von Dr.Krall und anderen seriösen Volkswirten legen nahe, daß in der Zeit um 2023-25 herum das Bankensystem und die Zombie-Unternehmen kollabieren.

    Eine Super-Inflation und evtl. später auch eine Stagflation sind zu erwarten.
    Die verzweifelten Versuche unserer geldpolitischen Dilettanten werden erfolglos sein, denn alle geplanten, unseriösen und volksschädlichen Maßnahmen werden das Desaster noch steigern.

    Ich rechne auch innerhalb der 20er Jahre nach einer Superinflation mit einer evtl.nachfolgen Währungsreform und dem gleichzeitigen Zusammenbruch der wahnwitzigen EU-Konstruktion.

    Meinen Klienten empfehle ich:

    Raus aus dem Euro
    Kauf von kurzfristig laufenden Staatsanleihen
    von relativ sicheren (nicht Euro) Staaten
    wie Schweiz, GB, Norwegen. USA, Australien (?) etc.
    Aktienkäufe (keine europäischen Werte) nach dem Crash
    Physisches Gold mindestens 25-35 % des Portfolios

    Wer kann, sollte das muslimisierte Deutschland mit seinen schwarz, rot, grün, linken Politnieten und Vaterlands-Abschaffern verlassen.

    Vielleicht wirds nach dem Crash allen besser gehen.
    Hoffentlich aber nicht den dämlichen Politikern und den korrupten und gierigen Eliten.

    Antworten
    • Avatar
      Zweifler sagte:

      @EMP
      Toll, was Sie alles aus den Planetenkonstellationen herauslesen. Sie besitzen als Astrologin sicherlich auch eine Kristallkugel, die Sie und Ihre Klienten vermutlich schon unendlich reich gemacht hat.
      Daß Sie trotzdem hier schreiben, finde ich nett von Ihnen. So kann sich bto endlich die Mühe komplizierter und schwieriger Analysen sparen und sich ganz auf die Sterne verlassen.

      Antworten
    • Avatar
      troodon sagte:

      @ EMP
      „Die Prognosen von Dr.Krall und anderen seriösen Volkswirten legen nahe, daß in der Zeit um 2023-25 herum das Bankensystem und die Zombie-Unternehmen kollabieren“
      Ach jetzt doch erst 2023-2025 ? Im März 2018 sprach Dr. Krall noch von „spätestens in zwei Jahren fliegt uns das angestaute Ungleichgewicht um die Ohren“. Verlässt man sich beim Timing auf die Prognosen von dem „Bankenkenner“ ist man wohl verlassen… Aber auch gut, dann können ja alle bis 2023 fröhlich weiter zocken :)

      Antworten

Ihr Kommentar

An Diskussion beteiligen?
Hinterlassen Sie einen Kommentar!

Schreibe einen Kommentar

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind mit * markiert.