Das Damokles­schwert der Schulden

Gerne verdrängt, verniedlicht und nicht ernst genommen: die hohe Verschuldung von Privatsektoren und Staaten in der Welt. Es egal zu sein, dass die Schulden immer schneller wachsen, während sich die Realwirtschaft auch ohne Corona immer weniger entwickelt. Für Letzteres haben wir ja eine Lösung: noch mehr Schulden …  Aber die Schulden sind schon lange nicht mehr die Lösung, sondern das Problem. Sie belasten die Realwirtschaft und bedrohen die Finanzmärkte. Die FINANCIAL TIMES (FT) bringt es erneut auf den Punkt:

  • „In the midst of a global pandemic and one of the steepest recessions ever, mainstream investment markets are very fully valued by historic standards. Since their bounce back from the coronavirus-induced plunge last March, they are so expensively priced that — in the judgment of veteran fund manager Howard Marks of Oaktree Capital: ‘The prospective returns on everything are about the lowest they’ve ever been.’ In short, investors are not being adequately compensated for risk in an uncertain world.“ – bto: Und wie immer finden sich Rationalisierungen für diese Entwicklung: die tiefen Zinsen, die Notenbanken, die alles Erdenkliche tun werden. Klar. Es stellt sich die Frage, was die Notenbanker machen und nicht wie viel die Unternehmen erwirtschaften. Dies ist auch der Hintergrund, vor dem solche spekulativen Exzesse wie die Posse um GameStop entstehen.
  • „When market valuations are elevated there is always a potential vulnerability to negative shocks. Among the obvious triggers are possible resurgences in the coronavirus, dips in economic activity and an escalation of bankruptcies in troubled sectors such as retail, hotels, transport and property. Moreover, the pandemic has taken hold at a time of rising geopolitical tension, with the US and China engaged in unprecedented strategic competition.“ – bto: Letztlich ist es müßig, den Auslöser zu erahnen, da es eben nur ein Auslöser ist, aber nicht die Ursache – egal was hinterher in den Medien erzählt wird.  
  • „Central banks act as market makers Markets are thus being driven primarily by economic policy decisions. And in a policy-driven market, the biggest single risk is policy reversal. (…) in a world of continuing deficient demand, excess capacity and high unemployment, an overhasty end to government support seems unlikely in 2021 (…) Even the IMF, traditionally a dyed-in-the-wool fiscal curmudgeon, has warned against early tightening. (…) Overall, fiscal policy in most of the developed world looks set to remain expansionary, while the central banks have demonstrated their readiness to act as market makers of last resort.“ – bto: So gesehen spricht doch alles für weiterhin gute Zeiten an den Börsen? Denn das Motto kann ja nur lauten, wir müssen weiter nach vorne marschieren, denn es gibt kein Zurück.
  • „Indeed, part of the reason for the rich valuations in today’s markets, according to Longview Economics, a research boutique, is that ever more newly-created money is chasing an ever-shrinking pool of investable assets as the central banks take assets on to their own balance sheets. These purchases increasingly extend to riskier paper such as corporate bonds, in the case of the Bank of England, or equities with the Swiss National Bank and the Bank of Japan. In effect, central banks have de-risked public markets, at least in the short term, while taking more risk on to their own balance sheets.“ – bto: Die Frage ist, ob es wirklich weniger Risiken gibt oder ob diese unter der geringen Volatilität und dem Vertrauen, immer gerettet zu werden, versteckt sind.
  • „The only limitation arises if their credibility erodes to the point where the public, plagued by rampant inflation, is no longer prepared to accept their IOUs. That credibility problem tends to make central banks uncomfortable with continuing balance sheet expansion.“ – bto: Das denke ich wiederum nicht. Solange keine Inflation spürbar ist, wird es keine Unruhe in der Bevölkerung geben. Die Notenbankbilanz ist den Bürgern herzlich egal.  
  • „With central banks systematically rigging markets, the resulting ultra-low interest rates pose risks to the structure of investors’ portfolios. The most pressing is reinvestment risk — the likelihood that investments providing a good return today cannot be replaced with equally attractive investments tomorrow, for example maturing bonds. Eric Knight of fund manager Knight Vinke sees this as potentially the single most destructive risk now facing long-term investors. He points out that a reduction in average returns from 8 per cent per annum to 6 per cent will result in the value of a pension fund’s portfolio falling by 35 per cent in 30 years and by 50 per cent in 50 years.“ – bto: Wenn es das erklärte Ziel ist, Schuldner zu entlasten, muss es zwangsläufig geringere Erträge für die Anleger bedeuten. Das hängt zusammen.
  • „Across the capital markets this has perverted the normal relationship between risk and reward: witness the narrowed gap between yields on investment grade corporate bonds and junk bonds; likewise the recent ability of Peru, a developing economy in a region notorious for sovereign defaults, to raise 100-year money at a coupon of a mere 3.23 per cent. Note, too, the risk-hungry penchant of British and other developed world investors to inflate the bitcoin bubble.“ – bto: Bitcoin ist in der Tat auch ein Beispiel für den Risikoappetit, wenngleich die Anhänger es als das Gegenteil charakterisieren würden.  
  • „In addition to the mispricing of risk, investors also face the problem that central bank liquidity creation has generated high valuations across multiple asset classes and countries. With those asset classes being more closely correlated than in the past, it becomes much harder to achieve portfolio diversification. (…) Economists Fernando Avalos and Dora Xia of the Basel-based Bank for International Settlements, the central banks’ organisation, point out that the response of 10-year US Treasury yields to sell-offs in the US’s S&P 500 equity index has become more muted since 2018, with bond prices falling (and thus bond yields rising) when equities have fallen. As a result US Treasury bonds’ status as the safest haven in a global storm has become less secure.“ – bto: Der Punkt der zunehmenden Korrelation ist besonders wichtig, weil es nichts anderes bedeutet, als dass die Märkte immer mehr auf geringe Volatilität setzen. Dies lullt die Investoren ebenfalls ein und erhöht so das Risiko von Einbrüchen.  
  • „How should investors position themselves against the risk of inflation? In the short run this is scarcely a concern. Since the great financial crisis, aggregate demand in the developed world has been anaemic and despite falls in unemployment to relatively low levels before the pandemic inflationary pressure was absent. Now, with the coronavirus, the deflationary forces in the economy have become intense. Yet there may be inflationary trouble further ahead.“ – bto: Es stimmt natürlich, dass wir es vorerst mit eher deflationären Tendenzen zu tun haben. Strukturell und auch wegen der politischen Maßnahmen mag sich das allerdings ändern.
  • Auch wegen der demografischen Änderungen. Dies hatten wir schon mehrfach an dieser Stelle und die FT greift es nochmals auf:  „In their new book, The Great Demographic Reversal, Charles Goodhart and Manoj Pradhan argue that the profound deflationary impulse of the past three decades was chiefly due to an enormous surge in the world’s labour supply resulting from favourable demographic trends and the entry of China and eastern Europe into the global trading system. (…) These trends, they say, are now about to reverse sharply thanks to the ageing of populations, while the world is in retreat from globalisation. (…) Against that background, the likelihood that quantitative easing would raise general price levels, rather than simply push up asset prices as has happened since 2008, looks real.“ – bto: Das finde ich einleuchtend und ich darf an dieser Stelle verraten, dass ich mit den Autoren gesprochen habe und das Interview in einem Podcast bringen werde.
  • „Other grounds for worrying about the risk of inflation include the extraordinary rise in global debt, which stands at levels never seen outside wartime. (…) This accumulation of debt is a direct result of ultra-low interest rates. William White, former economic adviser and head of the economic and monetary department at the Bank for International Settlements, suggests that by keeping interest rates too low in the attempt to generate economic growth central banks have induced corporations and households to take on more debt. This, says Mr White in an interview, creates a debt trap and rising instability. When a financial crisis strikes central banks have to save the system, but in doing so they create even more instabilities. ‘They keep shooting themselves in the foot,’ he adds.“ – bto: Das hat er auch im Gespräch mit mir deutlich gemacht.
  • „It is safe to assume that the great debt overhang is unsustainable and will never be paid off in full. After the first and second world wars, debt levels were brought down by a combination of robust economic growth, which helped raise tax revenues, and de facto defaults, either informally through inflation or formally by way of debt reconstruction. Unless there is a much greater improvement in developed world productivity (and thus growth) than now seems plausible, inflation will again have to do much of the debt reduction.“ – bto: Und danach sieht es auch aus.
  • „The question for investors is whether central banks can respond to rising inflationary pressure by raising rates on this huge debt pile without prompting a devastating shock to markets. In Mr White’s judgment, central banks know they cannot leave interest rates as low as they are, because they are inducing still more bad debt and bad behaviour. But they cannot raise rates because then they would trigger the very crisis they are trying to avoid.“ – bto: Das macht die kommenden Jahre auch so gefährlich.  
  • „So for retail investors the message is that government bonds, traditionally regarded as safe assets, are in the long run dangerous. Real assets, such as property — notably residential, warehouses and care homes — and a modicum of portfolio insurance by investment in gold, will offer greater safety in what is anyway likely to be a low-return world.“ – bto: Zu glauben, dass man dann sicher ist, halte ich für falsch. Dann drohen Steuern und Abgaben.  
  • „There will, in the end, be a reckoning. But the timing of any market crunch is inherently unpredictable — nor how it hits any particular country such as the UK. The American economist Herb Stein famously remarked that if something can’t go on forever, then it will stop. Less well known is the rejoinder by fellow economist Rudi Dornbusch who said: Yes, but it will go on a lot longer than you anticipate.“ – bto: Auch das macht es nicht leichter!

ft.com (Anmeldung erforderlich): “Debt dangers hang over markets”, 8. Januar 2021

Kommentare (13) HINWEIS: DIE KOMMENTARE MEINER LESERINNEN UND LESER WIDERSPIEGELN NICHT ZWANGSLÄUFIG DIE MEINUNG VON BTO.
  1. Dietmar Tischer
    Dietmar Tischer sagte:

    >„Central banks act as market makers Markets are thus being driven primarily by economic policy decisions. And in a policy-driven market, the biggest single risk is policy reversal. (…) in a world of continuing deficient demand, excess capacity and high unemployment, an overhasty end to government support seems unlikely in 2021>

    Das ist richtig – auch über 2021 hinaus werden die Zentralbanken die STABILISIERENDEN Institutionen sein.

    Eine grundsätzliche Änderung der Geldpolitik wird es auf absehbare Zeit nicht geben.

    Es gibt aber auch die POLITIK-MÄRKTE, d. h. den Märkte, auf denen politische Kräfte im Wettbewerb sind.

    Und da bestehen WACHSENDE Risiken für eine grundsätzliche Politik-Wende.

    Das muss nicht mit einer Änderung der Notenbankpolitik einhergehen.

    Aber es könnte irgendwann zu einer Konstellation kommen, in der GLAUBWÜRDIGKEIT und FUNITIONALITÄT der Notenbanken verlorengehen:

    Wachsende, nicht mehr kontrollierbare Inflation und Verlust der Konsens-Politik.

    Dann sind wir jenseits des Jordans.

    Antworten
  2. foxxly
    foxxly sagte:

    in den gesamt-geldkreislauf werden die schulden immer höher, als die kredithöhe es ist. warum? (wiederholung!)
    weil das geld für die kreditzinsen nicht da ist. erst durch neuverschuldung können die alt kreditzinsen bezahlt werden. dies ergibt die exponentielle schuldenentwicklung, – sowie den wachstumszwang.

    nach einem neubeginn durch große währungsreform, dauert es einige jahrzehnte und dann stehen wir wie heute vor unlösbaren problemen der überschuldungen und seinen folgen im täglichen leben.

    Antworten
    • Axel
      Axel sagte:

      @foxxly

      “weil das geld für die kreditzinsen nicht da ist. erst durch neuverschuldung können die alt kreditzinsen bezahlt werden. dies ergibt die exponentielle schuldenentwicklung, – sowie den wachstumszwang”

      Stimmt so natürlich nicht. Das gilt nur für die ersten Kredite. Danach kann das Geld umverteilt werden! Wenn ich meinem Bruder 10,- Euro leihe und 11,- zurück haben will, muß die Geldmenge nicht um 1,- wachsen. Er zahlt sie eben aus seinem Gehalt zurück und hat dann nur 1,- weniger im nächsten Monat zum verplempern übrig.
      Dabei ist es egal, ob die Bank oder ich den Zins verlange!
      (Beim Bankkredit wird hingegen natürlich Geld dem Kreislauf kurzzeitig hinzugefügt)

      Die Allerersten Gelder kommen dabei von den ZB und sind dabei sowieso zinsfrei, heißt, unterliegen noch nicht der Zinslogik.
      Durch Teilenteignungen (z.b. von Vermögenden) können notleidende (Zins-,Kredit-) Schulden auch elimeniert werden, ohne daß dabei das Geldmengenwachstum “exponentiell” wachsen muß.
      Werden Kredite hingegen nicht bedient, fällt auch der vermeintliche Geldmengenwachstumszwang durch die Zinsen weg.
      Das Geld ist jedoch in der Welt und kann durch Umverteilung, Besteuerung…wieder aus dem Kreislauf entzogen werden, womit die Geldmenge wieder schrumpft…

      Das die Geldmenge steigt, ist keine mathematische Notwendigkeit. Da viel geschöpftes Geld jedoch bei den Reichen und Wohlhabenden, sowie auf den Sparbüchern, etc. versandet, muß ständig neues Geld als Schmiermittel geschaffen werden, um “den Laden am Laufen zu halten”…das ist wohl wahr…

      Antworten
      • foxxly
        foxxly sagte:

        @ axel 14:57
        >>Das Geld ist jedoch in der Welt und kann durch Umverteilung, Besteuerung…wieder aus dem Kreislauf entzogen werden, womit die Geldmenge wieder schrumpft…<<

        …… ist das ihr voller ernst???????

        diese ausführung gleicht einer vorsätzlichen täuschung und ablenkung! vielleicht ein faschingsscherz? (eher, ein schlechter!)

  3. Hoxworth
    Hoxworth sagte:

    Ein sehr guter Beitrag,

    vielen Dank! Überhaupt finde ich es toll, dass hier gerne die FT zitiert wird! So braucht man sie nicht zu abonnieren..

    Nur zu einem Punkt ein kleiner Einwand, nämlich jenem der drohenden Enteignung und/oder höheren Besteuerung von Vermögungswerten, am meisten bedroht sind hier wohl Immobilien. Dieser Einwand ist sicher berechtigt, aber eher aus unserer Perspektive als deutsche oder wie in meinem Fall österreichische Staatsbürger. Die FT schreibt aber aus angelsächsischer Perspektive, und dort hatte und hat Privatbesitz einen wesentlich höheren Stellenwert. Ein Denken, wie es hier so sehr zuhause ist, dass nämlich, wenn die „Gemeinschaft“, also der Staat, etwas benötigt, es ohne weiteres ganz einfach und mit voller Berechtigung beim Bürger (hier eher Untertan) zu holen wäre, ist dort bei weitem nicht so ausgeprägt. Nicht umsonst ist dort die kommunistische Ideologie so verhasst, ganz im Gegensatz zu DE.

    Es ist, meine ich, hierzulande schon sehr wichtig, auch die Mobilität und Anonymität der eigenen Vermögenswerte zu beachten, also keinesfalls alles auf Immobilien zu setzen! Ideal ist für meine Begriffe hier Gold, übrigens auch im Fall eines Verbots. Es existiert jedoch möglicherweise ein Aspekt am Bitcoin, der mir bisher nicht so bewusst war: Mit Bitcoin lassen sich nämlich tatsächlich große – und auch sehr große – Vermögenswerte quasi auf Knopfdruck ins Ausland verbringen. Das ist mit Gold nicht ganz so problemlos möglich.

    Antworten
  4. weico
    weico sagte:

    @ Stelter

    “Auch wegen der demografischen Änderungen. Dies hatten wir schon mehrfach an dieser Stelle und die FT greift es nochmals auf: „In their new book, The Great Demographic Reversal, Charles Goodhart and Manoj Pradhan argue that…………. : Das finde ich einleuchtend und ich darf an dieser Stelle verraten, dass ich mit den Autoren gesprochen habe und das Interview in einem Podcast bringen werde.”

    Toll, freue mich schon auf den Podcast !

    Der von Ihnen erwähnte Mr. White, hat ja schon eine Buchkritik verfasst. Er sieht zwar auch die Argumente, von Goodhart/Pradhan, für eine Inflation….meint aber sehr TREFFEND:

    “Was ich damit sagen will: Es gibt sehr wohl starke Argumente für höhere Inflation in den kommenden Jahren, aber gleichzeitig sehe ich immer noch starke deflationäre Kräfte, die besonders von der fehlgeleiteten Geldpolitik der vergangenen Jahrzehnte – Stichwort Schuldenüberhang und Instabilitäten im Finanzsystem – begünstigt wurden. Der Grat wird immer schmaler, und wir könnten auf die eine oder andere Seite – Inflation oder «echte» Deflation – abkippen.”

    Dieses “abkippen” bzw. den “Kippeffekt/Kipppunkte” hat Mr. White auch schon in seinem Interview erwähnt:

    “Ich halte es aber für gefährlich, von der Annahme auszugehen, die Natur der Wirtschaft sei verständlich und damit kontrollierbar. Ich sehe die Wirtschaft als komplexes, adaptives System, voller Kipppunkte. Wir sollten nicht davon ausgehen, dass wir es kontrollieren können. Vielleicht erweist es sich unter depressiven Umständen als unmöglich, die Inflation zu erhöhen, vielleicht steigt sie aber auch plötzlich höher, als uns lieb ist.”

    Das Interview von William White:
    https://themarket.ch/interview/william-white-zentralbanker-sollten-viel-bescheidener-sein-ld.3052

    Buchkritik gibt’s hier:
    https://themarket.ch/meinung/werden-wir-in-den-zwanzigerjahren-die-rueckkehr-der-inflation-sehen-ld.3095

    Das Buch ,von Goodhart/Pradhan (als Vorbereitung zu Herrn Stelter’s Prodcast) hier:
    https://1lib.eu/book/11212769/8848fe

    Antworten
    • Axel
      Axel sagte:

      @weico

      Für mich immer noch die beste Analogie des Wirtschafts-, Finanz-, Gesellschafts-, Politik…etc. geschehens, welches noch um ein vielfaches komplexer ist, als hier dargestellt.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PIWbW2co5mY

      Auch ein Grund, warum ich Probleme habe, den stringenten, (wenn auch hochintelligenten), linearen Argumentationsketten z.b. eines Hr. Dr. Krall zu folgennn

      Antworten
    • Dietmar Tischer
      Dietmar Tischer sagte:

      @ weico

      Mr. White:

      >„Ich halte es aber für gefährlich, von der Annahme auszugehen, die Natur der Wirtschaft sei verständlich und damit kontrollierbar. Ich sehe die Wirtschaft als komplexes, adaptives System, voller Kipppunkte. Wir sollten nicht davon ausgehen, dass wir es kontrollieren können.>

      Solche Weisheiten sind geradezu banal:

      Kontrollieren im Sinne die Kipppunkte vorherzusehen und Sicherungen (Regelsysteme) einzubauen, damit das System sie NIE erreicht, ist eine Illusion, wenn wir über GESELLSCHAFTLICHE Systeme reden.

      Die Frage ist vielmehr:

      Können wir die TENDENZEN der wirtschaftlichen Entwicklung genau genug einschätzen, haben wir die Mittel, möglichen Entgleisungen entgegenzuwirken und können wir diese so einsetzen, dass diese vermieden werden?

      Kurzum:

      Es geht NICHT um die KONTROLLE der Wirtschaft, sondern darum eine letztlich nicht kontrollierbare Wirtschaft durch Eingriffe STABIL zu halten, d. h. vor nicht mehr beherrschbarer DISRUPTION zu bewahren.

      Warum dieser Unterschied?

      Technisch-physikalische Systeme kann man prinzipiell kontrollieren, weil man die DETERMINANTEN ihrer Veränderung kennt.

      Die Dampfmaschine wurde zur bahnbrechend nutzbaren Erfindung, als man mit dem Fliehkraftregler AUTOMATISCH konstante Drehzahlen erzielen konnte.

      In sozialen Systemen kennt man lediglich die AKTEURE, aber nicht die Determinanten, weil es immer wieder neue Konfigurationen von Akteuren mit unterschiedlichen Interessen und Einflusssphären gibt.

      Antworten
  5. markus
    markus sagte:

    Fast immer wenn ich von Schulden höre, vermisse ich die Erwähnung von Vermögen. “Zu viele Schulden” impliziert gleichzeitig … ja was ;) ?

    Antworten
    • Richard Ott
      Richard Ott sagte:

      @markus

      “Fast immer wenn ich von Schulden höre, vermisse ich die Erwähnung von Vermögen.”

      Jaja, der Einwand kommt dann immer. Sie wollen auf den scheinbaren Dualismus Schulden-Vermögen hinaus. Das ist aber zu simpel. Wenn der Schuldner kurz vor der Pleite steht, werden die Effekte asymmetrisch und chaotisch.

      Wie viel ist denn eine Forderung gegenüber jemandem wert, der pleite ist?

      Bonusfrage: Wie viel ist eine Forderung von jemandem an Sie wert, wenn derjenige pleite ist? (Antwort: Genau so viel wie vorher, seine Pleite ändert nichts daran, dass der oder der Insolvenzverwalter seine Forderung Ihnen gegenüber eintreiben wird.)

      Antworten
      • markus
        markus sagte:

        “Wenn der Schuldner kurz vor der Pleite steht, werden die Effekte asymmetrisch und chaotisch.”

        Letzteres bezweifelt ja keiner. Was meinen Sie mit “asymmetrisch”? Ich wollte nur darauf hinaus, dass, wenn Ungleichheit strukturell begünstigt wird, sich, niemand wundern braucht, dass Schulden UND Vermögen ansteigen. Und an der strukturellen Begünstigung ändern auch Transferleistungen nichts, wie man am Ansteigen der Ungleichheit trotz dieser Transfers sieht.

    • der Kater
      der Kater sagte:

      Nachdem gewaltige Summen dieser Staatsanleihen (Schulden) von der EZB gehalten werden:

      „Zu viele Schulden“ impliziert gleichzeitig …

      … zu viel EZB?
      … zu viel Zentralismus?
      … zu viel dysfunktionale Bürokratie?
      … zu viele planwirtschaftliche Projekte?
      … zu viel Gelddrucken?
      … zu viel club med Einfluss?

      … zu viele Sorgen, weil’s eh schon wurscht ist?

      Antworten
  6. ruby
    ruby sagte:

    Unewigkeit

    Der Toth erzählt sein Gesellschaftsprinzip, das darin endet, immer mit dem Verlassen einer angeblich verdorbenen Gesellschaft weiter ziehen zu müssen, um sein Heil aufrecht zu erhalten.

    What for a Schmarrn !

    https://atlantis-and-atlanteans.org/thoth-the-atlantean.htm

    In Analogie wurde das Geldsystem konstruiert, besser manipuliert.

    Denn Finanzamathematik und Investitionsrechnung zinsen zukünftige Kapitalwerte in die Gegenwart hin immer auf, weil etwas heute immer einen höheren Wert besitzt, also genauer dieser zugeschrieben wird (fiktiv mit einem angenommenen Diskontierungszinssatz/Zinsfuß/kalkulatorischen Zins).

    Da aber niemand die Zukunft tatsächlich kennt, ist dieses Rechenspiel mit der Simulation der Zukunft ins Jetzt und Heute volle Phantasie, also ein Kunstprodukt und nichts göttliches sondern pure Spekulation.

    Genau das wollen diese Geschichtenerzähler vertuschen und verstecken.

    Sie haben die höhere Verschuldung der Gegenwart mit all ihren Lügenparametern vollgestopft, so daß aktuell 400 Billionen Kreditversprechen nur 50 Billionen Realvermögen in den Bilanzen gegenüberstehen. Unlösbarkeit!

    Schlußetappe : Zusammenbruch des Wirtschaftssystems der Falschheiten mit ihrer Flucht und neuen Namensgebung sowie einer neuen Variante der immer gleichen Erzählungsanleitung.

    Doch nun ist Finale, denn es ist genug Wissen und Vermittlung durch Technologie dauerhaft möglich zu offenbaren, so daß der Schwindel endet.

    Alles Gute im freien Leben.

    Antworten

Ihr Kommentar

An Diskussion beteiligen?
Hinterlassen Sie einen Kommentar!

Schreibe einen Kommentar zu Richard Ott Antworten abbrechen

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind mit * markiert.